Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Unleash your inner da Vinci with these art and science drawing lessons

Learn how to draw realistic figures for comic books, anatomy courses, and more.

  • Masterpieces like the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper followed countless hours of anatomical studies.
  • Leonardo da Vinci was fascinated by the human form.
  • The Complete Creative Art & Science of Drawing Bundle teaches you how to draw human bodies, heads, and more.
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Musicians and their audiences show synchronized patterns of brain activity

Researchers observed "inter-brain coherence" (IBC) — a synchronisation in brain activity — between a musician and the audience.

Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash
When a musician is playing a piece, and the audience is enjoying it, they can develop physical synchronies. Both might tap their feet, sway their bodies, or clap their hands.
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Talent, you’re born with. Creativity, you can grow yourself.

In such states of creative divergent thinking, the body is aroused and the pupils become dilated.

OSCAR RIVERA/AFP via Getty Images
Creativity, it is said, is intelligence having fun.
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Five essential writing tips backed by science

Will Storr has written a masterful guide to writing with "The Science of Storytelling."

Photo by Steve Johnson / Unsplash
  • In "The Science of Storytelling," journalist Will Storr investigates the science behind great storytelling.
  • While good plots are important, Storr writes that great stories revolve around complex characters.
  • As in life, readers are drawn to flawed characters, yet many writers become too attached to their protagonists.
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Move over, math. The universal language is world music.

A new study finds that societies use the same acoustic features for the same types of songs, suggesting universal cognitive mechanisms underpinning world music.

  • Every culture in the world creates music, though stylistic diversity hides their core similarities.
  • A new study in Science finds that cultures use identifiable acoustic features in the same types of songs and that tonality exists worldwide.
  • Music is one of hundreds of human universals ethnographers have discovered.
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