New research finds playfulness is a skill anyone can learn

The improvement in personal well-being might be worth effort.

Credit: Shutterstock
  • Researchers in Germany discovered that even serious adults can become playful with training.
  • Developing a playful attitude leads to better overall well-being.
  • Play is a deeply embedded ancestral brain system, according to neuroscientist Jaak Panksepp.
Keep reading Show less

Can a quantum strategy help bring down the house?

Study finds quantum entanglement could, in principle, give a slight advantage in the game of blackjack.

Photo by Sheri Hooley on Unsplash
In some versions of the game blackjack, one way to win against the house is for players at the table to work as a team to keep track of and covertly communicate amongst each other the cards they have been dealt.
Keep reading Show less

Missing the bar? Become a master mixologist in your living room.

Certified sommelier Carlos Batista will show you the ropes of bartending.

  • Neighborhood bars might be closed, but you can still enjoy your favorite cocktails at home.
  • Sommelier Carlos Batista will teach everything you need to know about vodka, sake, tequila, wine, whiskey, and more.
  • In his nine-course bundle, you'll learn all about flavors, how to read labels, and how to mix the perfect drink.
Keep reading Show less

Creativity: The science behind the madness

Human brains evolved for creativity. We just have to learn how to access it.

  • An all-star cast of Big Thinkers—actors Rainn Wilson and Ethan Hawke; composer Anthony Brandt; neuroscientists David Eagleman, Wendy Suzuki, and Beau Lotto; and psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman—share how they define creativity and explain how our brains uniquely evolved for the phenomenon.
  • According to Eagleman, during evolution there was an increase in space between our brain's input and output that allows information more time to percolate. We also grew a larger prefrontal cortex which "allows us to simulate what ifs, to separate ourselves from our location in space and time and think about possibilities."
  • Scott Barry Kaufman details 3 brain networks involved in creative thinking, and Wendy Suzuki busts the famous left-brain, right-brain myth.

Chemistry for kids: Make a DIY bubble snake!

A fun and completely safe experiment for the family to try during quarantine.

  • Most of us are staying home to help flatten the curve of COVID-19, but that doesn't mean there isn't learning and fun to be had.
  • It's important to take a break from screen time. Kate the Chemist, professor, science entertainer, and author of "The Big Book of Experiments," has just the activity: Creating a bubble snake using common household ingredients including dish soap, food coloring, rubber bands, a towel, and a small plastic bottle.
  • In this step-by-step tutorial, Kate walks us through the simple process of building the apparatus and combining materials to bring the fun snakes to life.

Keep reading Show less
Quantcast