Skepticism: Why critical thinking makes you smarter

Being skeptical isn't just about being contrarian. It's about asking the right questions of ourselves and others to gain understanding.

  • It's not always easy to tell the difference between objective truth and what we believe to be true. Separating facts from opinions, according to skeptic Michael Shermer, theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, and others, requires research, self-reflection, and time.
  • Recognizing your own biases and those of others, avoiding echo chambers, actively seeking out opposing voices, and asking smart, testable questions are a few of the ways that skepticism can be a useful tool for learning and growth.
  • As Derren Brown points out, being "skeptical of skepticism" can also lead to interesting revelations and teach us new things about ourselves and our psychology.
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  • Learning a foreign language can be daunting, but immersive training can help you sound like a local faster than you think.
  • The critically acclaimed Rosetta Stone language-learning method has been trusted for over 26 years and offers over 24 languages you can learn from your phone, computer, or tablet.
  • You can sign up for a one-year subscription and get access to unlimited languages for $99.99 (44% off) for a limited time.
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4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work

More than 70% of college students procrastinate

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If you take classes online, chances are you probably procrastinate from time to time.

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While the pandemic has caused thousands of small businesses to temporarily close or shutter for good, the disappearance of the corner coffee shop means more than lost wages.

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Marcus Aurelius helped me survive grief and rebuild my life

It's a common misconception that to be a Stoic is to be in possession of a stiff upper lip.

FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP via Getty Images
'When I was a child, when I was an adolescent, books saved me from despair: that convinced me that culture was the highest of values.'
From The Woman Destroyed (1967) by Simone de Beauvoir
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