Saying no is hard. These communication tips make it easy.

You can say 'no' to things, and you should. Do it like this.

  • Give yourself permission to say "no" to things. Saying yes to everything is a fast way to burn out.
  • Learn to say no in a way that keeps the door of opportunity open: No should never be a one-word answer. Say "No, but I could do this instead," or, "No, but let me connect you to someone who can help."
  • If you really want to say yes but can't manage another commitment, try qualifiers like "yes, if," or "yes, after."
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Are you an overbuyer or an underbuyer?

One way to limit clutter is by being mindful of your spending.

  • Overbuyers are people who love to buy — they stockpile things as a result. These are individuals who are prone to run out of space in trying to store their stuff and they may even lose track of what — and how much of what — they have.
  • One way overbuyers can limit their waste, both money and space wise, is by storing items at the store, and then buy them when they really need them.
  • Underbuyers tend to go to extraordinary lengths to not buy things. They save money and do fewer errands, however, they often make do with shabby personal items. They may also, when they finally decide to go out to buy a product, go without entirely because the item may no longer be available.

Chores cause conflict. Try managing them like this instead.

Here's how to set clear expectations about household management.

  • When managing household tasks, its best to set clear expectations about whose job it is to take care of what.
  • Often we do things we feel are important, and put less value on other tasks others may be doing — it's important to show appreciation to keep home maintenance a well-oiled machine.
  • Often people feel it's not their responsibility to keep things maintained when others are acting similarly in a shared space.
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The U-curve of happiness: Why old age is a time of psychological bliss

Here's why many 80 year olds are probably happier than you.

  • The U-curve of happiness shows that we humans are most content at the beginnings and ends of our lives.
  • The famous midlife crisis is the trough of our happiness because it's a time when we have responsibility for people older and younger than us, and we grow aware that we may not fulfill the dreams of our youth.
  • Children and people in their 80s are uniquely able to live in the moment and be happy because they live at a neurological and psychological sweet spot, respectively.
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Master the art of networking, from entrance to exit

4 steps to go from nervous wreck to networking master.

  • This crash course in communication will help you turn an opportunity into a real outcome.
  • There are 4 progressive stages to networking: Ask curious questions, listen and probe (or share), connect and find similarities, and the close.
  • The exit is one of the most important stages; a good close means managing the mood memory – leave the person with a positive mood connected to your conversation, even if they don't remember exactly what you said.
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