'Vastly underestimated': Fossil fuels emit 40% more methane than previously thought, study finds

Methane is 80 times more effective than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere.

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  • Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas on the planet.
  • A recent study analyzed ice core samples from the pre-industrial era to measure the extent to which industry has played a role in increasing atmospheric methane levels.
  • The researchers note that their results suggest action can be taken to stem methane pollution.
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War is an ecological catastrophe

Researchers believe that war exacerbates climate change, threatening the environment and making future wars more likely.

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  • In times of war, otherwise atrocious crimes against nature become routine.
  • The U.S. Department of Defense is one of the largest consumers of fossil fuels in the world.
  • By polluting the earth to prepare for war, the Pentagon prepares a world in which war becomes more likely.
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What is the Halliburton loophole?

A loophole signed into law during the Bush administration has been fiendishly tough to close.

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  • In 2005, then-Vice President Dick Cheney was head of the Energy Task Force. This task force provided recommendations that informed the Energy Policy Act of 2005.
  • One such recommendation that was later signed into law was to provide an exemption for hydraulic fracturing fluid (or fracking fluid) from being regulated by the EPA.
  • Cheney previously served as CEO of Halliburton, which just so happens to be the world's largest provider of fracking services.
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The U.S. military emits more greenhouse gases than Sweden and Denmark

The war machine needs fuel, perhaps so much as to make protecting oil redundant.

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  • A new study shows how the United States' Military is the largest institutional emitter of greenhouse gasses in the world.
  • These emissions come from both combat and non-combat operations.
  • The use of some of the fossil fuels the military burns to protect the supply of oil creates an interesting paradox.
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7 climate change projects that are changing the game

While there's plenty to be worried about, it's important to remember that we're making progress, too.

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  • If we do nothing, global temperatures could rise as high as 10 degrees Celsius by the end of the century.
  • Fortunately, humanity is hard at work at keeping temperature increases below the 2 degrees Celsius mark.
  • These 7 projects are just a snapshot of what humanity is collectively doing to fight back and beat climate change.
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