Alan Watts on the meaning of life

The British philosopher reminds us that meaning is anywhere we choose to look.

Photo: Pictorial Parade/Getty Images
  • Alan Watts suggests there is no ultimate meaning of life, but that "the quality of our state of mind" defines meaning for us.
  • This is in contradiction to the notion that an inner essence is waiting to be discovered.
  • Paying attention to everyday, mundane objects can become highly significant, filling life with meaning.
Keep reading Show less
Personal Growth

Alan Watts and the art of meditation

Forget everything you think you know about meditation.

  • Alan Watts cuts to the root of what meditation really is all about.
  • Meditative practice has no motive, except to experience the present moment.
  • Practice a guided meditation by focusing on the now.
Keep reading Show less
Personal Growth

Why radicals can't recognize when they're wrong

It's not just ostriches who stick their head in the sand.

Image source: Shutterstock
  • Not only does everyone have personal experience with how difficult it can be to change people's minds, but there's also empirical research showing why this is the case.
  • A new study in Current Biology explains why some people seem to be constitutionally incapable of admitting they're wrong.
  • The study shows the underlying mechanism behind being bull-headed, and there may be some ways to get better at recognizing when you're wrong.
Keep reading Show less
Mind & Brain

Jordan Peterson's take on the origins of the Buddha

In this short video, he compares the outset of Buddhism with the biblical garden.

  • During this class, Jordan Peterson describes how overprotective parenting led to the creation of Buddhism.
  • Peterson compares the Buddhist origin myth with the story of Eden.
  • Both tales deal with the onset of consciousness and mortality and therefore are universal in appeal.
Keep reading Show less
Culture & Religion
Photo credit: Ian Stauffer on Unsplash
  • Practicing self-compassion is shown to reduce arousal and increase parasympathetic activation in a new study.
  • Feeling comfortable in your skin leads to higher-order emotions, such as empathy and compassion.
  • Buddha realized this millennia ago when prescribing compassion as the path to self-realization.
Keep reading Show less
Personal Growth