These 1,000 hexagons show how global wealth is distributed

A cartogram makes it easy to compare regional and national GDPs at a glance.

Credit: BerryBlue_BlueBerry, reproduced with kind permission
  • On these maps, each hexagon represents one-thousandth of the world's economy.
  • That makes it easy to compare the GDP of regions and nations across the globe.
  • There are versions for nominal GDP and GDP adjusted for purchasing power.
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Greed and the philosophy of wealth

When does a healthy desire for wealth morph into greed? And how can we stop it?

Credit: Evelyn De Morgan / Wikipedia / Public domain
  • It's common wisdom that most things in life are best in moderation.
  • Most of us agree that owning property is okay but are hard-pressed to say why and when it has gone too far.
  • Greed dominates your life if the pursuit of wealth is a higher priority than charity, kindness, and solidarity with others.
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Modern society is as unequal as 14th century Europe

As bad as this sounds, a new essay suggests that we live in a surprisingly egalitarian age.

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  • A new essay depicts 700 years of economic inequality in Europe.
  • The only stretch of time more egalitarian than today was the period between 1350 to approximately the year 1700.
  • Data suggest that, without intervention, inequality does not decrease on its own.
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America’s prison catastrophe: Can we undo it?

The US prison system continues to fail, so why does it still exist?

  • The United States is the world's largest prison warden. As of June 2020, America had the highest prisoner rate, with 655 prisoners per 100,000 of the national population. But according to experts, doing something the most doesn't mean doing it the best.
  • The system is a failure both economically and in terms of the way inmates are treated, with many equating it to legal slavery. American prisons en masse are expensive, brutal, and ineffective, so why aren't we trying better alternatives? And what exactly are these overstuffed facilities accomplishing?
  • Damien Echols and Shaka Senghor share first-hand accounts of life both in and after prison, while political science professor Marie Gottschalk, activist Liza Jessie Peterson, historian Robert Perkinson, and others speak to the ways that America's treatment of its citizens could and should improve. "The prison industrial complex is a human rights crisis," says Peterson. "Something needs to be done."
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How Atlantic City inspired the Monopoly board

The popular game has a backstory rife with segregation, inequality, intellectual theft, and outlandish political theories.

Credit: Davis DeBard, with kind permission.
  • The streets on a classic Monopoly board were lifted from Atlantic City.
  • Here's what it looks like if we transport those places back onto a map.
  • Monopoly started out as its opposite: a game explaining the evil of monopolies.
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