Why overeating is an ecological nightmare

A new research article states that the obesity epidemic is affecting more than just waistlines.

Photo: Getty Images
  • While the cost of food waste is high, the environmental impact of obesity is even higher.
  • According to researchers in Italy, obesity results in an extra 140 billion tons of food consumption every year.
  • Obesity costs Americans $1.72 trillion in healthcare costs and is now the leading cause of death.
Keep reading Show less

Don't romanticize the gig economy: Freelancers often work more, new study finds.

The question is, how can we make employment fair for everyone?

Photo credit: Smith Collection / Gado / Getty Images
  • A new study from Russia's Higher School of Economics details the many disadvantages of freelancing.
  • Problems with the gig economy include longer working hours, working on weekends and holidays, and no employee benefits.
  • New legislation in California is attempting to address these issues, but may harm more than it helps.
Keep reading Show less

Obesity is the leading cause of death in America. When will we talk about it?

Bill Maher called for fat shaming last week. His argument makes sense.

Photo by Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images
  • As the NY Times reports, obesity is the leading cause of death in America, costing the health care system $1.72 trillion.
  • Bill Maher called for fat shaming as a means of transforming the lethargic mindset about obesity.
  • When implemented properly, shame can be an important and powerful tool, writes NYU professor Jennifer Jacquet.
Keep reading Show less

New blood test accurately predicts when people will die — within 5–10 years

The large-scale study got it right for 83 percent of participants. Would you take the blood test?

Photo credit: Miguel Bruna on Unsplash
  • A research team found 14 biomarkers can accurately predict death within 5–10 years.
  • Such a test could help doctors and researchers prescribe better courses of treatments for patients.
  • Information about mortality might inspire people to eat better and exercise more, thus reversing the effects of some biomarkers.
Keep reading Show less

Have we reached a humane alternative to the war on drugs?

Can treating addiction as a disease work better than treating it as a vice?

Getty Images
  • The War on Drugs has taken fifty years of America's time, and an unfathomable amount of our blood and treasure.
  • A new method for dealing with drug abuse, treating it as a disease rather than a moral failure, is being tried.
  • Studies suggest this is a better way to deal with the problem, and programs using this view are seeing success.
Keep reading Show less