The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced a number of new behaviours into daily routines, like physical distancing, mask-wearing and hand sanitizing. Meanwhile, many old behaviours such as attending events, eating out and seeing friends have been put on hold.

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Move over Theragun, this DIY massage gun is only $60

Efficiently soothe your muscles with this AI-based DIY massager, on sale for over 70% off.

  • If working out or working from home is giving you body aches, a massage gun could make a world of a difference.
  • This easy-to-use device helps you get a DIY massage wherever and whenever you need it.
  • The Actigun Percussion Massager works with any budget, making it an excellent alternative to the popular Theragun.
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Why the capitalist market model destroys the safeguards of some professions

The neoliberal call for more 'choice', seems hard to resist.

Alvaro Calvo/Getty Images
The young doctor was desperate. 'I need to talk to my patients,' she said, 'and give them time to ask questions."
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As we approach death, our dreams offer comfort and reconciliation

As patients approached death, many had dreams and visions of deceased loved ones.

Credit: Amisha Nakhwa on Unsplash

One of the most devastating elements of the coronavirus pandemic has been the inability to personally care for loved ones who have fallen ill.

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​These light-emitting "smart" tattoos could act as medical monitors

Light-emitting tattoos could indicate dehydration in athletes or health conditions in hospital patients.

Credit: Barsotti - Italian Institute of Technology
  • Researchers at UCL and IIT have created a temporary tattoo that contains the same OLED technology that is used in TVs and smartphones.
  • This technology has already been successfully applied to various materials including glass, food items, plastic, and paper packaging.
  • This advance in technology isn't just about aesthetics. "In healthcare, they could emit light when there is a change in a patient's condition - or, if the tattoo was turned the other way into the skin, they could potentially be combined with light-sensitive therapies to target cancer cells, for instance," explains senior author Franco Cacialli of UCL.
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