Jordan Peterson on Joe Rogan: The gender paradox and the importance of competition

The Canadian professor has been on the Joe Rogan Experience six times. There's a lot of material to discuss.

  • Jordan Peterson has constantly been in the headlines for his ideas on gender over the last three years.
  • While on Joe Rogan's podcast, he explains his thoughts on the gender differences in society.
  • On another episode, Peterson discusses the development of character through competition.
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‘Playing the victim’ is politically vital and morally serious

Victims are moral agents rather than moral patients.

A woman with her face painted with the feminist hand symbol attends a demonstration marking International Women's Day in Lisbon on March 8, 2019. (Photo by PATRICIA DE MELO MOREIRA / AFP/Getty Images)

Those who speak out against bad treatment are often dismissed as 'playing the victim', accused of dwelling on imagined slights or indulging in an exaggerated sense of grievance. In the face of ridicule or, worse, the threat of violence, it would be easier to keep quiet. And yet, victims of injustice often do speak up: far from any desire for glory, they are often morally motivated, and act from a sense of duty.

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Gender equality in STEM is possible. These countries prove it.

Globally 72 percent of scientific researchers are men. But there are some exceptions.

Forensic scientist Jasmine Thomas prepares blood samples for DNA extraction for evidence in a sexual assault case in the Forensic Evidence section of the Louisiana State Crime Lab June 4, 2003 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. (Photo by Mario Villafuerte/Getty Images)

There should be no shortage of inspirational role models for young girls dreaming of a career in science. Women have been responsible for some of the most important scientific breakthroughs that shaped the modern world, from Marie Curie's discoveries about radiation, to Grace Hopper's groundbreaking work on computer programming, and Barbara McClintock's pioneering approach to genetics.

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Why sexist and racist philosophers might still be admirable

Our culture has its own mistaken assumption: that the individual is an autonomous human intellect independent from the social environment.

graffiti in Buffalo NY by victorgrigas via Wikimedia Commons

Admiring the great thinkers of the past has become morally hazardous. Praise Immanuel Kant, and you might be reminded that he believed that 'Humanity is at its greatest perfection in the race of the whites,' and 'the yellow Indians do have a meagre talent'. Laud Aristotle, and you'll have to explain how a genuine sage could have thought that 'the male is by nature superior and the female inferior, the male ruler and the female subject'.

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Gossip was a powerful tool for the powerless in Ancient Greece

Through calculated use of gossip, women, non-citizens, or slaves wielded a potent weapon against those who wronged them.

Photo credit: Nicholas Tsikourias / Keystone / Hulton Archive / Getty Images

At the heart of the greatest works of Ancient Greek literature are mighty acts of revenge. Revengers overcome their enemies through superior physical prowess, as when Achilles kills Hector in a single combat to avenge the death of his comrade Patroclus; or through their employment of trickery and deceit, as when Medea slays Creon and his daughter by using poisoned clothing in revenge against Jason, her unfaithful husband. But how could a person lacking in physical strength, magical abilities or supportive friends take revenge?

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