Study finds new ways of detecting dark matter in black holes

A new study proposes that Hawking radiation could be used to find dark matter in places like primordial black holes.

Credit: Magann / Adobe Stock.
  • A new paper narrowed down what type of black holes may be the best candidates for containing dark matter.
  • So far, dark matter has not been directly observed.
  • The research team also developed new techniques to spot Hawking radiation that potentially comes from black holes.
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Galactic wind from early universe detected

Researchers discovered a galactic wind from a supermassive black hole that sheds light on the evolution of galaxies.

Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)
  • A new study finds the oldest galactic wind yet detected, from 13.1 billion years ago.
  • The research confirms the theory that black holes and galaxies evolve together.
  • The galactic wind was spotted using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile.
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Extreme black holes may have "hair," find scientists

Researchers discover black holes that violate the uniqueness theorem and have "gravitational hair."

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  • Scientists discover that some extreme black holes may violate the "no hair" theorem.
  • These black holes feature properties outside of the three classical black hole traits of mass, spin, and charge.
  • The researchers ran sophisticated simulations to discover these space oddities.
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Are we living in a baby universe that looks like a black hole to outsiders?

Baby universes led to black holes and dark matter, proposes a new study.

Credit: Kavli IPMU
  • Researchers recently used a huge telescope in Hawaii to study primordial black holes.
  • These black holes might have formed in the early days from baby universes and may be responsible for dark matter.
  • The study also raises the possibility that our own universe may look like a black hole to outside observers.
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New data reveals Earth closer to a black hole and is moving 16,000 mph faster

A new study shows our planet is much closer to the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center than previously estimated.

Credit: NAOJ
  • A Japanese radio astronomy project revealed Earth is 2,000 light years closer to the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's center.
  • The data also showed the planet is moving 7 km/s or 16,000 mph faster in orbit around the Galactic Center.
  • The findings don't mean Earth is in more danger from the black hole but reflect better modeling of the galaxy.
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