Doing good may make people look better

Experts on the science of giving look into whether there's another possible upside to doing good: physical attractiveness.

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Giving is good for you.

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  • A new study found that weekly 15-minute "awe walks" have positive effects on mental health.
  • Volunteers reported higher levels of gratitude and compassion after eight weeks of these short walks.
  • Researchers believe this low-cost intervention could help prevent cognitive decline in older adults.
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Study: Unattractive people far overestimate their looks

The finding is remarkably similar to the Dunning-Kruger effect, which describes how incompetent people tend to overestimate their own competency.

  • Recent studies asked participants to rate the attractiveness of themselves and other participants, who were strangers.
  • The studies kept yielding the same finding: unattractive people overestimate their attractiveness, while attractive people underrate their looks.
  • Why this happens is unclear, but it doesn't seem to be due to a general inability to judge attractiveness.
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How old would you want to be in heaven?

Is the cult of youth what we really want trailing us into the afterlife?

Photo by Sam Wheeler on Unsplash

Many religious faiths propose different versions of heaven as a location: There are walled gardens with streams, flowers, pleasing scents, pretty angels, rapturous music or delicious accessible food.

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Princeton: Stylish men are perceived as 'significantly more competent'

As much as we say it's not about the clothes, it's still about the clothes.

Photo credit: Mike Marsland / WireImage
  • A new study from Princeton University shows that perception of competence is linked to dress.
  • Researchers discovered the same results over nine separate studies: men that dress better are viewed as more competent.
  • Even when told clothing is not a measure of competence, judges ruled in favor of the better-dressed men.
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