New Hubble images add to the dark matter puzzle

The images and our best computer models don't agree.

  • Scientists can detect the gravitational effects of invisible dark matter.
  • Dark matter causes visual distortions of what's behind it.
  • The greater the distortion, the greater the amount of dark matter. Maybe.
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    A new minimoon is headed towards Earth, and it’s not natural

    Astronomers spot an object heading into Earth orbit.

    Credit: PHOTOCREO Michal Bednarek/Paitoon Pornsuksomboon/Shutterstock/Big Think
  • Small objects such as asteroids get trapped for a time in Earth orbit, becoming "minimoons."
  • Minimoons are typically asteroids, but this one is something else.
  • The new minimoon may be part of an old rocket from the 1960s.
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    The world’s largest space camera’s first test subject? Broccoli.

    Construction is nearly complete for a camera that will take 3,200-megapixel panoramas of the southern night sky.

  • The Vera C. Rubin Observatory in Chile is about to get the world's biggest camera for astronomy.
  • The images the camera takes contain billions of pixels.
  • It can capture objects 100 million times fainter than the human eye can see.
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    Scientists discover first 'intermediate-mass' black hole in massive merger

    It's the largest black hole merger ever observed by scientists.

    Credit: Pixabay
    • In 2019, scientists detected gravitational waves that were later determined to come from the merging of two so-called "intermediate-mass" black holes.
    • These black holes were thought to exist, but had never been directly observed.
    • The discovery sheds new light on how black holes form.
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    3 wonders of the universe, explained

    Astronomer Michelle Thaller schools us on what atoms really look, the Big Bang theory, and the speed of light.

    • Most people have seen atoms illustrated in textbooks and know about the Big Bang and the speed of light, but there is a good chance what you think you know is not scientifically accurate.
    • Michelle Thaller, an astronomer and Assistant Director for Science Communication at NASA, is here to clear up the misconceptions and explain why atoms don't actually look that way, why the Big Bang is a misnomer, and why the speed of light is more than just really fast.
    • Is there an edge of space? Does light experience time? Watch this video for answers to those and other interesting questions.

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