Gamma-ray space telescope study may have spotted dark matter

New study of gamma rays and gravitational lensing points to the possible presence of dark matter.

NASA
  • Analyzing data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, researchers find hints of dark matter.
  • The scientists looked to spot a correlation between gravitational lensing and gamma rays.
  • Future release of data can pinpoint whether the dark matter is really responsible for observed effects.
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The long, wild story of the universe, in 5 eras

Astronomers find these five chapters to be a handy way of conceiving the universe's incredibly long lifespan.

Image source: Ryan Hutton/unsplash
  • We're in the middle, or thereabouts, of the universe's Stelliferous era.
  • If you think there's a lot going on out there now, the first era's drama makes things these days look pretty calm.
  • Scientists attempt to understand the past and present by bringing together the last couple of centuries' major schools of thought.
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Want to be an astronaut? NASA is hiring!

Here's a look at the space agency's astronaut candidate requirements.

Photo by NASA on Unsplash
  • NASA has begun accepting applications for its next class of astronauts and plans to have its final selections for candidates in mid-2021.
  • U.S. citizens have until March 31, 2020 to apply.
  • Basic qualifications include either holding a master's degree in a STEM field, having completed a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathic medicine degree, or have two years of work toward a STEM Ph.D. program.
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Scientists discover animal that doesn't need oxygen to live

It's the first time scientists have discovered an animal that doesn't perform aerobic respiration.

STEPHEN D. ATKINSON
  • The animal is a tiny parasite called Henneguya salminicola.
  • The parasite infects salmon and lives within the fish muscle, though scientists aren't quite sure how it breaks down nutrients for survival.
  • The findings are published in the journal PNAS.
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How to deflect an asteroid

MIT engineers devise a decision map to identify the best mission type to deflect an incoming asteroid.

Nick Owuor (astro.nic.visuals) on Unsplash

On April 13, 2029, an icy chunk of space rock, wider than the Eiffel Tower is tall, will streak by Earth at 30 kilometers per second, grazing the planet's sphere of geostationary satellites.

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