The cost of world peace? It's much less than the price of war

The world's 10 most affected countries are spending up to 59% of their GDP on the effects of violence.

Mario Tama/Getty Images
  • Conflict and violence cost the world more than $14 trillion a year.
  • That's the equivalent of $5 a day for every person on the planet.
  • Research shows that peace brings prosperity, lower inflation and more jobs.
  • Just a 2% reduction in conflict would free up as much money as the global aid budget.
  • Report urges governments to improve peacefulness, especially amid COVID-19.
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13 films everyone should watch and why—as voted by you

A curated watchlist from Big Think readers.

Credit: Columbia Pictures / Walt Disney Studios
  • We asked Big Think's readers and staff for their recommendations on films everyone should watch.
  • A collection of fiction and non-fiction works from around the world, these movies will entertain and expand your horizons.
  • The films cover various topics, explore numerous themes, and shed light on several controversial historical events.
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What a carve-up: when French and British ruled the world

James Gillray's 'plumb-pudding' caricature is "probably the most famous political cartoon of all time."

Credit: Public domain, via the British Library
  • The fight for world dominance always seems to involve a contest between two superpowers.
  • Back in 1805, it was the British versus the French, and this cartoon pokes fun at both.
  • Pitt and Napoleon are carving out the big slices of the world-pudding – an image endlessly copied since.
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Best. Science. Fiction. Show. Ever.

"The Expanse" is the best vision I've ever seen of a space-faring future that may be just a few generations away.

Credit: "The Expanse" / Syfy
  • Want three reasons why that headline is justified? Characters and acting, universe building, and science.
  • For those who don't know, "The Expanse" is a series that's run on SyFy and Amazon Prime set about 200 years in the future in a mostly settled solar system with three waring factions: Earth, Mars, and Belters.
  • No other show I know of manages to use real science so adeptly in the service of its story and its grand universe building.
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How art and design can rebuild a community

MIT professor Azra Akšamija creates works of cultural resilience in the face of social conflict.

Credit: Memory Matrix
In the spring of 2016, a striking art installation was constructed outside MIT's building E15.
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