Can you still spread coronavirus after getting the vaccine?

The vaccine will shorten the "shedding" time.

Fredrik Lerneryd/Getty Images
Editor's note: So you've gotten your coronavirus vaccine, waited the two weeks for your immune system to respond to the shot and are now fully vaccinated.
Keep reading Show less

Eight women at the forefront of the world’s COVID-19 response

Beyond making up 70% of the world's health workers, women researchers have been at the cutting edge of coronavirus research.

Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images
  • The gender gap persists, as only 33% of the world's researchers are women.
  • Here are just some of the women making lasting contributions in the fight against COVID-19.
  • They include Dr Özlem Türeci, co-founder of BioNTech, which helped produce the first vaccine.
Keep reading Show less

Russian scientists study prehistoric animal viruses from the permafrost

Researchers analyze prehistoric viruses in animals dug out from the Siberian permafrost.

Credit: Nina Sleptsova/NEFU
  • Scientists in a Siberian laboratory in Russia began studying ancient viruses.
  • The viruses come from prehistoric animals dug out from the melting permafrost.
  • The research lab used to be a center for the development of biological weapons.
Keep reading Show less

One year of COVID-19: What will we learn?

Pandemics have historically given way to social revolution. What will the post-COVID revolution be?

Credit: tur-illustration via Adobe Stock / Big Think
  • The US is approaching 500,000 COVID-19 deaths. What can we learn from one year of loss and chaos?
  • The lessons are clear. Among them are realizing our fragility as a species, our codependence as humans, and the urgent need to move beyond social injustice and inequity.
  • As with the Renaissance following the Black Plague of the 14th century and the explosive creativity of the 1920s post Spanish influenza, this is our turn to redefine the course of history. Let's not mess this up.
Keep reading Show less

Can better data defeat the next pandemic?

Northwell Health has built an elaborate data system to track and fight COVID-19. If this system goes global, it could prevent a future pandemic.

  • This coronavirus pandemic is very much still ongoing, but now is the time to discern its lessons so that we are more prepared for the next one. Michael Dowling, president and CEO of Northwell Health, shares how their health system is collecting and utilizing vast amounts of health data to best care for patients and to quickly identify and manage COVID-19 surges.
  • "I would say that we probably had the most elaborate dashboard of any health system dealing with this crisis," says Dowling. Northwell Health has also developed a "local surveillance tracking system" which has allowed them to react to COVID spikes early. Dowling hopes that these systems will be adopted by and improved upon by other networks.
  • In addition to improvements to New York State's illness surveillance system, Dowling hopes to see a more global approach to fighting the pandemic where infection data is tracked shared between nations and warning signs can be acted on early enough to avoid another crisis.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast