For $50, convert your phone into a powerful chemical, pathogen detector

A team of scientists managed to install onto a smartphone a spectrometer that's capable of identifying specific molecules — with cheap parts you can buy online.

  • Spectroscopy provides a non-invasive way to study the chemical composition of matter.
  • These techniques analyze the unique ways light interacts with certain materials.
  • If spectrometers become a common feature of smartphones, it could someday potentially allow anyone to identify pathogens, detect impurities in food, and verify the authenticity of valuable minerals.
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Vaccines and the power of positive reinforcement

People may be more willing to get vaccinated when told how popular it is.

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Public health officials have issued plenty of warnings about people who are reluctant to get vaccinated for Covid-19.
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COVID-19 survivor’s guilt is a growing problem as we confront our losses

A psychologist and a doctor of emergency medicine explain.

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People are eager to return to normal after a year of coronavirus, but is the U.S. there yet? Hardly. The ongoing psychological and spiritual damage caused by the pandemic is rising, too.

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Can you still spread coronavirus after getting the vaccine?

The vaccine will shorten the "shedding" time.

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Editor's note: So you've gotten your coronavirus vaccine, waited the two weeks for your immune system to respond to the shot and are now fully vaccinated.
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Eight women at the forefront of the world’s COVID-19 response

Beyond making up 70% of the world's health workers, women researchers have been at the cutting edge of coronavirus research.

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  • The gender gap persists, as only 33% of the world's researchers are women.
  • Here are just some of the women making lasting contributions in the fight against COVID-19.
  • They include Dr Özlem Türeci, co-founder of BioNTech, which helped produce the first vaccine.
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