10 paradoxes that will stretch your mind

From time-traveling billiard balls to information-destroying black holes, the world's got plenty of puzzles that are hard to wrap your head around.

Big Think
  • While it's one of the best on Earth, the human brain has a lot of trouble accounting for certain problems.
  • We've evolved to think of reality in a very specific way, but there are plenty of paradoxes out there to suggest that reality doesn't work quite the way we think it does.
  • Considering these paradoxes is a great way to come to grips with how incomplete our understanding of the universe really is.
Keep reading Show less

How trying to solve death makes life, here and now, worse

Maybe we should stop worrying about what happens after we die, and make the best of what we have on earth right now.

  • The concept of the afterlife, argues Michael Shermer, take away from appreciating what we have right in front of us.
  • Why be afraid of death? 100 billion humans have died before us. It's part of the process.
  • Maybe that '80s song was right... maybe heaven really is a place on earth.
Keep reading Show less

New controversial theory: Past, present, future exist simultaneously

Our experience of time may be blinding us to its true nature, say scientists.

Back to the Future.
  • Time may not be passing at all, says the Block Universe Theory.
  • Time travel may be possible.
  • Your perception of time is likely relative to you and limited.
Keep reading Show less

You thought quantum mechanics was weird: check out entangled time

What if entanglement also occurs across time? Is there such a thing as temporal nonlocality?

 

Photo by Tristan Gassert on Unsplash

In the summer of 1935, the physicists Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger engaged in a rich, multifaceted and sometimes fretful correspondence about the implications of the new theory of quantum mechanics. The focus of their worry was what Schrödinger later dubbed entanglement: the inability to describe two quantum systems or particles independently, after they have interacted.

Keep reading Show less
Self-portrait of artist Angela Palmer's brain unveiled (Photo by Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images)

Neuroscientists discover networks of neurons that stretch or compress their activity to control timing

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office

Keep reading Show less