Lab grown chicken nuggets makes cruelty-free meat possible

We eat 50 billion chickens every year. Is there a better way?

Freethink Media Inc
  • A restaurant in Singapore recently served the world's first lab grown chicken nuggets.
  • Grown from animal cells, the nuggets taste like chicken because they are made from real chicken.
  • The lab grown chicken is only available in Singapore, though regulatory agencies in other countries are considering approval.
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Meet the worm with a jaw of metal

Metal-like materials have been discovered in a very strange place.

Credit: Mike Workman/Adobe Stock
  • Bristle worms are odd-looking, spiky, segmented worms with super-strong jaws.
  • Researchers have discovered that the jaws contain metal.
  • It appears that biological processes could one day be used to manufacture metals.
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Researchers 3D bioprint realistic human heart model for the first time

A new method is able to create realistic models of the human heart, which could vastly improve how surgeons train for complex procedures.

Credit: Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering
  • 3D bioprinting involves using printers loaded with biocompatible materials to manufacture living or lifelike structures.
  • In a recent paper, a team of engineers from Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering developed a new way to 3D bioprint a realistic model of the human heart.
  • The model is flexible and strong enough to be sutured, meaning it could improve the ways surgeons train for cardiac surgeries.
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By folding DNA into a virus-like structure, MIT researchers have designed HIV-like particles that provoke a strong immune response from human immune cells grown in a lab dish. Such particles might eventually be used as an HIV vaccine.

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Could you become a 'natural' blonde by altering your genes?

Exploring how a small change in your DNA sequence can make you a natural blonde.

A few weeks after preparing them, Dr Catherine Guenther checked her mouse embryos and knew that she had identified the source of a blond-haired mutation in human DNA.

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