Two-thirds of U.S. students attend diverse schools

School diversity is less widespread in central and northern states

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  • In 2020, there will be more children of color than white children in the U.S.
  • These maps indicate how racial diversity is changing the demographics of America's schools
  • Diversity has massively increased, but more so in the south and on the coasts than elsewhere
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Study: Ending the racial wealth gap would add a trillion dollars to the economy

America's racial wealth disparity is entrenched, with devastating effects. What if we got rid of it?

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  • A new study shows that the wealth gap in the United States is still here, huge, and affects every aspect of our economic lives.
  • The authors explain that narrowing the gap would increase GDP size substantially.
  • The study also reminds us that little will change without major policy changes.
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Should students learn about their implicit biases in grade school?

The development of implicit biases starts at a young age and then they get reinforced over time.

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  • Awareness of your implicit biases can lessen their effect.
  • In the classic "Draw-A-Scientist Test" young students overwhelmingly drew similar representations of a scientist.
  • Teaching young people to become aware of the idea of their "implicit biases" could help them better understand their peers.
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Exposing our hidden biases curbs their influence, new research suggests

Do you know the implicit biases you have? Here are some ways to find them out.

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  • A study finds that even becoming aware of your own implicit bias can help you overcome it.
  • We all have biases. Some of them are helpful — others not so much.
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Are immigrants being scapegoated? Andrew Yang (and new research) suggests yes.

Immigrants add way more to the American economy than they take.

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  • Andrew Yang said immigrants are being scapegoated for racist reasons during the last presidential debate.
  • 45 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or their children, making a $6.1 trillion economic impact.
  • Even undocumented immigrants pay an estimated $11.6 billion a year in taxes, overturning the myth that they're "takers."
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