Learn microprocessor and microcontroller programming with this beginner’s course

Don't be intimidated: there's an easy way to get started.

  • Programming microtechnology is becoming a popular and widely pursued hobby.
  • If you’ve never done it before, it’s difficult to know where to start.
  • The Internet of Things bundle has the basics of Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and more covered.
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Brain-controlled chess is here

The most mental game in existence no longer requires fingers.

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  • A brain-controlled interface implements a two-step process: Identify the chess piece, then place it on the board.
  • The program was 96 percent accurate at correctly moving chess pieces.
  • This research opens up opportunities for physically impaired people to express themselves in new ways.
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Is computer code a language or math? MIT study uses brain scans for answers

How our brains interpret computer code could impact how we teach it.

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  • Computer coding is a relatively new skill, so our brains can't have specialized areas for it from birth.
  • The question of how we process computer code, as a language or as math, could impact how we teach the subject.
  • A new MIT study suggests our brains treat it as its own special topic.
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The incredible physics behind quantum computing

Can computers do calculations in multiple universes? Scientists are working on it. Step into the world of quantum computing.

  • While today's computers—referred to as classical computers—continue to become more and more powerful, there is a ceiling to their advancement due to the physical limits of the materials used to make them. Quantum computing allows physicists and researchers to exponentially increase computation power, harnessing potential parallel realities to do so.
  • Quantum computer chips are astoundingly small, about the size of a fingernail. Scientists have to not only build the computer itself but also the ultra-protected environment in which they operate. Total isolation is required to eliminate vibrations and other external influences on synchronized atoms; if the atoms become 'decoherent' the quantum computer cannot function.
  • "You need to create a very quiet, clean, cold environment for these chips to work in," says quantum computing expert Vern Brownell. The coldest temperature possible in physics is -273.15 degrees C. The rooms required for quantum computing are -273.14 degrees C, which is 150 times colder than outer space. It is complex and mind-boggling work, but the potential for computation that harnesses the power of parallel universes is worth the chase.
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This $50 crash course can boost your skills in electronics, programming, and robotics

Learn the ins and outs of Raspberry Pi, Python, and ROS2 from talented engineers.

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