Do we actually grow from adversity?

"That which does not kill us, makes us stronger"?

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In our culture, there's this idea that enduring a tragedy can be good for your personal growth. You'll have a newfound appreciation for life.

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Delayed gratification and the quest to bridge the person-situation debate

Are we born with self-control? Or does context change our behavior?

  • Are behaviors innate, or are they shaped by our surroundings?
  • David Epstein poses this question as he examines the person-situation debate through the lens of the famed marshmallow test, an experiment in the self-control of children.
  • Simple strategies can be taught to help delay gratification, which suggests our personality traits can undergo change depending on context.
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Science explains why we love being scared

Psychologists discover why people participate in scary attractions.

  • Psychologists link anxiety from ambiguity to why we find some people or situations creepy.
  • A study showed that people who go to scary attractions find their moods improving and stress levels lowered.
  • Scary situations can produce a euphoria and a sense of achievement.
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None of us enjoys having our job cut into our leisure time. So the next time your boss asks you to work late and miss your band rehearsal or board game night, point them to a new study in the Journal of Vocational Behavior.

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The fast track to a life well lived is feeling grateful

How does gratitude work its mental magic?

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For the Ancient Greeks, virtue wasn't a goal in and of itself, but rather a route to a life well lived.

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