Is this Danish island soon coming to a coast near you?

An artificial island in the North Sea is the biggest building project ever in Danish history - and could pave the way for many more.

  • In 1991, Denmark constructed the world's first offshore wind farm.
  • Now they're building an entire 'Energy Island' in the North Sea.
  • As the U.S. catches up, Danish know-how could soon come to America.
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An ancient migration across the ocean was no accident

A new study shows that at least one long-ago journey would have required deliberate navigation.

Credit: Yosuke Kaifu/University of Tokyo
  • Historians have wondered whether ancient mariners drifted from Taiwan to Japan or navigated there on purpose.
  • The passage between Taiwan and the Ryukyu islands contains one of the world's strongest currents.
  • Thousands of buoys suggests that the journey was anything but an accident.
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Stanford engineers develop new light and sound tech to finally map the ocean floor

A clever new design introduces a way to image the vast ocean floor.

Credit: ValentinValkov/Adobe Stock
  • Neither light- nor sound-based imaging devices can penetrate the deep ocean from above.
  • Stanford scientists have invented a new system that incorporates both light and sound to overcome the challenge of mapping the ocean floor.
  • Deployed from a drone or helicopter, it may finally reveal what lies beneath our planet's seas.
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For starlet sea anemones, more food means more arms

A new study finds that starlet sea anemones have the unique ability to grow more tentacles when they've got more to eat.

Credit: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center/Wikimedia
  • These anemones belong to the Cnidaria phylum that continues developing through its lifespan.
  • The starlet sea anemone may grow as many as 24 tentacles, providing there's enough food.
  • When deprived of the chance to reproduce, they also grow more tentacles.
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Some shark species have evolved to walk

The relatively quick evolution of nine unusual shark species has scientists intrigued.

Credit: Lubo Minar / Unsplash
  • Living off Australia and New Guinea are at least nine species of walking sharks.
  • Using fins as legs, they prowl coral reefs at low tide.
  • The sharks are small, don't be frightened.
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