Is Juche the state religion of North Korea?

Is Juche an ideology, a scam, or a very strange religion?

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  • North Koreans are known for fanatical dedication to their tyrannical rulers.
  • Some have argued that this is because the ideology of Juche is less an ideology than it is a religion.
  • Several elements of Juche were clearly influenced not by Marx, but by Confucius.
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Politics & Current Affairs

What is Juche, the state ideology of North Korea?

Is it the key to understanding why North Korea acts like it does, or an elaborate sham?

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  • North Korea is an anomaly among nations, but is there a method to its madness?
  • Juche, meaning "self-reliance", is the official ideology of the country which supposedly informs its actions.
  • Some observers question the sincerity of the ideology, dismissing it as mere propaganda.
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Politics & Current Affairs

Did Trump abandon South Korea at the North Korean summit?

Eugene Gholz, the associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, posits that President Trump's decision to suspend U.S. military operations on the Korean peninsula negates decades of foreign policy.

Eugene Gholz, an associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, argues that President Trump's decision to suspend the U.S. military's training exercises on the Korean peninsula is a lot more nuanced—and a lot more strategic to foreign policy—than perhaps many people realize. Will South Korea be left in the lurch if the US suspends military exercises? Hardly. Eugene is brought to you today by The Charles Koch Foundation. The Charles Koch Foundation aims to further understanding of how US foreign policy affects American people and societal well-being. Through grants, events, and collaborative partnerships, the Foundation is working to stretch the boundaries of foreign policy research and debate by discussing ideas in strategy, trade, and diplomacy that often go unheeded in the US capital. For more information, visit charleskochfoundation.org.

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Why the World May Be Safe with More Nuclear Weapons, Not Fewer

What's really involved in snuffing out a country’s nuclear capabilities—and is that the right war to be waging?

Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, and Kim Jong Un.

The United States tries hard to keep nuclear weapons away from countries it considers foes. Given how close the world came to nuclear armageddon during the Cold War, and recent threats from so-called “rogue states" like North Korea, it may seem like an essential goal. But America's strategy for thwarting nuclear proliferation may be reaching a point where the costs outweigh the benefits.

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America Is Preventing Nuclear Attacks in All the Wrong Ways

There's a deep psychological reason that America treats nuclear weapons like a spoiled child hogging all the neighborhood candy. Are we too paranoid to see it?

Nuclear weapons are an odd conundrum for the world (and indeed the human species) as of late. Remnants of WW2 and indeed the Cold War, they're mostly used now as a kind of insurance policy for the safety of a country. It's like keeping a loaded gun. And like guns, America (no surprises here) has a whole lot of them and (just like a gun) they don't want anyone they don't like to have them. America is even willing to have preventative wars so that other countries don't develop nuclear weapons; which in turn breeds resentment and even more countries that resent us... who then in turn develop more nukes. It's a vicious cycle. And it may not end well. The Charles Koch Foundation aims to further understanding of how US foreign policy affects American people and societal well-being. Through grants, events, and collaborative partnerships, the Foundation is working to stretch the boundaries of foreign policy research and debate by discussing ideas in strategy, trade, and diplomacy that often go unheeded in the US capital. For more information, visit charleskochfoundation.org.

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