400 women will use 'weed tampons' for Harvard cannabis study

They cost about $11 and contain 60mg of THC, the main psychoactive component of marijuana, and 10mg of CBD.

  • A new observational study will ask 400 women to track their menstrual symptoms over the course of a few months during which they'll administer marijuana suppositories.
  • Marijuana suppositories are designed to alleviate the pain and stress of periods.
  • The observational study is described as a "first step," with the ultimate goal being a clinical trial that includes placebos.
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Surprising Science

The DEA is finally changing how it regulates marijuana products

With the approval of a childhood epilepsy medication the federal government can no longer claim marijuana has no medical benefit.

Demonstrators Protest DEA Raids On Marijuana ClinicsWEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - JANUARY 18: Protesters demonstrate the day after Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raids shut down 11 medical marijuana clinics around Los Angeles County on January 18, 2007 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
  • For the first time in nearly a half-century, the federal government has approved a medication with a cannabis compound.
  • CBD is all the rage in health food stores, but credible research is needed to know what therapeutic applications hold up.
  • DEA officer says this could signal a "sea change" in the legalization of cannabis-related products.
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Culture & Religion

Texas has its first legal medical marijuana transaction

The first medicinal marijuana patient in Texas uses it to treat severe epilepsy. And although 10 companies are allowed to grow marijuana within Texas state borders, the substance itself is still illegal.

Marijuana / Texas flag

Texas passed a certain milestone as it became the 30th state in the U.S. to administer legal medical marijuana after doctors in central Texas prescribed CDB oil to a 6 year-old girl with epilepsy.

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Politics & Current Affairs

Vets Say Marijuana Treats PTSD, but Their Doctors Can't Prescribe It

Military veterans nationwide want those diagnosed with PTSD to be able to get a VA doctor's recommendation for medical marijuana.

Soldiers with the U.S. Army march in the annual Veteran's Day Parade along Fifth Avenue on November 11, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

7-8% of the nation’s population will have PTSD at some point in their lifetime, estimate researchers from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

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Surprising Science