Mathematical model shows how the Nazis could have won WWII's Battle of Britain

With just a few strategical tweaks, the Nazis could have won one of World War II's most decisive battles.

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  • The Battle of Britain is widely recognized as one of the most significant battles that occurred during World War II. It marked the first major victory of the Allied forces and shifted the tide of the war.
  • Historians, however, have long debated the deciding factor in the British victory and German defeat.
  • A new mathematical model took into account numerous alternative tactics that the German's could have made and found that just two tweaks stood between them and victory over Britain.
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How are implicit biases holding us back?

Overcoming assumptions when it comes to gender and capabilities is the key to a successful society.

  • It's important to realize the implicit biases we carry regarding gender.
  • In school settings, women are less likely to be encouraged to pursue careers in STEM fields because it's assumed that men have greater math skills. This simply isn't true.
  • In the interest of a successful society, everyone should be allowed to pursue work based on their interests and skills.
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Can 'math trauma' hurt people's finances?

Math trauma can follow people beyond grade school to harm their prospects well into adulthood.

Photo credit: RJ Sangosti / The Denver Post via Getty Images
  • As much as 17 percent of the American population may suffer from math trauma.
  • Math trauma prevents people from engaging in financial activities and may harm their career prospects.
  • Experts agree that developing growth mindsets in students is critical to prevent further harm.
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Does science suffer from a lack of imagination?

Eric Weinstein says that we need to rethink the current scientific model to allow for more dreaming.

Photo credit: Josh Hild on Unsplash
  • On his new podcast, The Portal, Eric Weinstein argues the scientific method strangles ingenuity by fostering groupthink over imagination.
  • He quotes Jim Watson: "In order to make great advances, we need to be irresponsible."
  • Working out errors in public will prove more valuable than defaulting to consensus.
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Bank of England to honor Alan Turing on £50 note

"It is almost impossible to put into words the difference that Alan Turing made to society."

Bank of England
  • The late British mathematician and theoretical computer scientist Alan Turing will appear on Britain's 50-pound note starting in 2021.
  • Turing is best known for helping to crack the Nazis' Enigma machine, a feat that's estimated to have cut World War II short by two years.
  • The British government, which chemically castrated Turing in 1952 for "homosexual acts," officially apologized to Turing in 2009.
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