New Google AR exhibits let you see prehistoric creatures up close

Google's Arts & Culture app just added a suite of prehistoric animals and NASA artifacts that are viewable for free with a smartphone.

Google Arts & Culture
  • The exhibits are viewable on most smartphones through Google's free Arts & Culture app.
  • In addition to prehistoric animals, the new exhibits include NASA artifacts and ancient artwork.
  • The Arts & Culture app also lets you project onto your walls famous paintings on display at museums around the world.
Keep reading Show less

Google to fund 100,000 online certificate scholarships

The Silicon Valley titan has promised scholarships for its tech-focused certificate courses alongside $10 million in job training grants.

  • America is facing a "middle-skills gap" thanks to the rapid digitalization of work.
  • Google announces new online certificate courses and 100,000 need-based scholarships to train people for in-demand skills.
  • The need for middle-skills will grow as the COVID-19 pandemic hastens technological adoption.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Online symptom-checkers are wrong two-thirds of the time

    Google is probably wrong about your health condition.

    Photo Credit: Westend61 / Getty Images
    • Thirty-six different international mobile and internet-based symptom checkers gave a correct diagnosis as the top result only 36 percent of the time.
    • Web advice on when and where to seek healthcare treatment was correct 49 percent of the time.
    • It's been estimated that Google's health related searches approximate to 70,000 every minute.
    Keep reading Show less

    How Apple and Google will let your phone warn you if you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus

    Apps that warn about close contact with COVID-19 cases can help relax social distancing rules.

    Photo by Timon Studler on Unsplash

    On April 10, Apple and Google announced a coronavirus exposure notification system that will be built into their smartphone operating systems, iOS and Android. The system uses the ubiquitous Bluetooth short-range wireless communication technology.

    Keep reading Show less

    The digital economy benefits the 1%. Here’s how to change that.

    A pragmatic approach to fixing an imbalanced system.

    • Intentional or not, certain inequalities are inherent in a digital economy that is structured and controlled by a few corporations that don't represent the interests or the demographics of the majority.
    • While concern and anger are valid reactions to these inequalities, UCLA professor Ramesh Srinivasan also sees it as an opportunity to take action.
    • Srinivasan says that the digital economy can be reshaped to benefit the 99 percent if we protect laborers in the gig economy, get independent journalists involved with the design of algorithmic news systems, support small businesses, and find ways that groups that have been historically discriminated against can be a part of these solutions.
    Quantcast