The digital economy benefits the 1%. Here’s how to change that.

A pragmatic approach to fixing an imbalanced system.

  • Intentional or not, certain inequalities are inherent in a digital economy that is structured and controlled by a few corporations that don't represent the interests or the demographics of the majority.
  • While concern and anger are valid reactions to these inequalities, UCLA professor Ramesh Srinivasan also sees it as an opportunity to take action.
  • Srinivasan says that the digital economy can be reshaped to benefit the 99 percent if we protect laborers in the gig economy, get independent journalists involved with the design of algorithmic news systems, support small businesses, and find ways that groups that have been historically discriminated against can be a part of these solutions.

What happens to your social media when you die?

Do you want Facebook or Google to control your legacy?

Photo by Josh Marshall on Unsplash
  • Faheem Hussain, clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University, says we need to discuss our digital afterlife.
  • One major problem is that we generally avoid talking about death in the first place.
  • Where and how we (and our data) will be used when we die remains a mystery.
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Tech has a diversity problem. Can an app for black professionals help?

The BYP Network is shining light on overlooked talent in certain industries.

Photo Source: BYP Network media kit
  • The most underrepresented group in the tech industry is the black population, especially in technical and leadership roles.
  • The BYP Network is a new platform helping to shine light on talent that is too often overlooked in industries like tech.
  • The network currently has around 40,000 users and is projected to grow to 500,000 by 2021.
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Google just put real-time language translation in the palm of our hands

Interpreter, Google's language translating tool, is coming to mobile and it's poised to change our everyday conversations.

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  • Google's real-time language translation tool, Interpreter Mode, is now accessible on mobile devices.
  • Through easy, real-time translation, individuals will be able to better immerse themselves in new cultures and connect with others in more intimate, fulfilling ways.
  • As the linguistic topography of the U.S. changes, Google is making it easier than ever to embrace new cultures by learning their languages.
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Google’s Sycamore beats top supercomputer to achieve ‘quantum supremacy’

The achievement is an important milestone in quantum computing, Google's scientists said.

Google
  • Sycamore is a quantum computer that Google has spent years developing.
  • Like traditional computers, quantum computers produce binary code, but they do so while utilizing unique phenomena of quantum mechanics.
  • It will likely be years before quantum computing has applications in everyday technology, but the recent achievement is an important proof of concept.
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