The woman who created the technology behind internet calls explains what it takes to innovate

She's the reason you're able to work and chat from home.

New America / Wikimedia Commons

If you've ever wondered how a Zoom call works, you might want to ask Marian Croak, Vice-President of Engineering at Google.

Keep reading Show less

Are brain teasers and apps a waste of time?

Recent research shows that brain teasers don't make you smarter and don't belong in job interviews because they don't reflect real-world problems.

  • There is little research to prove that brain games improve general cognition or slow cognitive decline. Rather they simply make you better at playing that specific brain game.
  • Brain teasers are a useless tool during job interviews as they can't predict how an interviewee will perform in real world tasks relevant to the job role.
  • Exercise, nutrition, socialization, and meditation are probably better brain boosters.
Keep reading Show less

New Google AR exhibits let you see prehistoric creatures up close

Google's Arts & Culture app just added a suite of prehistoric animals and NASA artifacts that are viewable for free with a smartphone.

Google Arts & Culture
  • The exhibits are viewable on most smartphones through Google's free Arts & Culture app.
  • In addition to prehistoric animals, the new exhibits include NASA artifacts and ancient artwork.
  • The Arts & Culture app also lets you project onto your walls famous paintings on display at museums around the world.
Keep reading Show less

Google to fund 100,000 online certificate scholarships

The Silicon Valley titan has promised scholarships for its tech-focused certificate courses alongside $10 million in job training grants.

  • America is facing a "middle-skills gap" thanks to the rapid digitalization of work.
  • Google announces new online certificate courses and 100,000 need-based scholarships to train people for in-demand skills.
  • The need for middle-skills will grow as the COVID-19 pandemic hastens technological adoption.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Online symptom-checkers are wrong two-thirds of the time

    Google is probably wrong about your health condition.

    Photo Credit: Westend61 / Getty Images
    • Thirty-six different international mobile and internet-based symptom checkers gave a correct diagnosis as the top result only 36 percent of the time.
    • Web advice on when and where to seek healthcare treatment was correct 49 percent of the time.
    • It's been estimated that Google's health related searches approximate to 70,000 every minute.
    Keep reading Show less
    Quantcast