10 things you did as a kid that you should start doing again

Playing and being creative shouldn't stop when you grow up.

  • Growing up doesn't mean your life has to be all about work.
  • Studies have shown that playing and being creative has numerous health benefits for adults of all ages.
  • Simple exercises like drawing, finishing a puzzle, or taking breaks outdoors can have a positive impact on your life.

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Another important reason to stay fit: your independence

Increasing numbers of seniors need help with basic tasks. It doesn't have to be that way.

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  • Everyone suffers from sarcopenia: the loss of muscle mass and strength due to age.
  • While there are numerous benefits to exercise, an important one is remaining independent well into old age.
  • Weightlifting is essential for keeping muscle mass and strength as the decades go by.
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How 'creativity sprints' can get your creative brain going

Need to kick-start your creativity? This technique can really help.

  • The best way to become more creative? Exercise your creativity like you would your body.
  • Set realistic expectations. Nobody is going to become the best immediately and write an amazing novel, or what have you, in a week.
  • Curiosity is the fuel that drives creativity. Pick a big goal and find out every small aspect about it to break it down.
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    • A recent study from the Department of Health and Human Services found that 80 percent of Americans don't exercise enough.
    • Small breaks from work add up, causing experts to recommend short doses of movement rather than waiting to do longer workouts.
    • Rethinking what exercise is can help you frame how you move throughout your day.
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    How to make time for exercise — even on your craziest days

    A new study shows choosing to be active is a lot of work for our brains. Here are some ways to make it easier.

    There's no shortage of science suggesting that exercise is good for your mental as well as your physical health — and yet for many of us, incorporating exercise into our daily routines remains a struggle. A new study, published in the journal Neuropsychologia, asks why. Shouldn't it be easier to take on a habit that is so good for us?

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