Information itself may be what ends the human race

"We are literally changing the planet bit by bit, and it is an invisible crisis."

  • IBM estimates that humans produce 2.5 quintillion digital data bytes daily.
  • We'll one day reach a point where the number of bits we store outnumber the entirety of atoms on Earth.
  • In the most severe scenario, it takes just 130 years for all the power generated on Earth to be sucked up by digital data creation and storage.

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Can your smartphone detect how drunk you are?

A small proof-of-concept study shows smartphones could help detect drunkenness based on the way you walk.

Photo by wavebreakmedia on Shutterstock
  • The legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for driving in the U.S is 0.08 percent. You can measure your BAC 15 minutes after your first drink and your levels will remain safe if you consume no more than one standard drink per hour.
  • Portable breathalyzers can be used to measure BAC, but not many people own these devices.
  • A small proof-of-concept study suggests that your smartphone could detect your drunkenness based on the way you walk.
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All the storage you'll ever need to back up your data for under $100

Degoo's secure backups are available at a great price.

  • 140,000 hard drives crash in America every week.
  • 93 percent of businesses that suffer data loss for over 10 days file for bankruptcy within 12 months.
  • Four million data records are stolen or lost every single day.
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These are the 10 most discussed tech topics during COVID-19

Here's how the world's technology conversations are changing.

Photo by Pawel Nolbert on Unsplash

COVID is changing the world and our technology conversations are changing with it.

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3 questions to ask yourself next time you see a graph, chart, or map

Start by reading the title, looking at the labels and checking the caption. If these are not available – be very wary.

Photo by Giacomo Carra on Unsplash

Since the days of painting on cave walls, people have been representing information through figures and images.

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