Amazon might have a Cambridge Analytica-size problem

Amazon could be the next big tech firm to find itself in the eye of a data privacy storm.

  • This year the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke, implicating Facebook and creating mass data privacy concern.
  • Concerns have been raised of Amazon user information being leaked to third parties on a regular basis.
  • With the amount of sensitive information and huge number of users on the Amazon platform, this is no small concern.
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Marriott data breach hits 500 million guests. Here’s what to do if you’re one of them.

It's likely one of the biggest data breaches in corporate history.

Sheraton
  • The breach dates back to 2014 and potentially affected 500 million customers.
  • Millions of guests potentially had credit card information stolen.
  • It's likely the second largest data breach in corporate history.
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A.I. turns 57 million crop fields into stunning abstract art

Detailed (and beautiful) information on 57 million crop fields across the U.S. and Europe are now available online.

Image: OneSoil
  • Using satellite images and artificial intelligence, OneSoil wants to make 'precision farming' available to the world.
  • The start-up from Belarus has already processed the U.S. and Europe, and aims for global coverage by 2020.
  • The map is practical, and more — browse 'Random Beautiful Fields' at the touch of a button.
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This is how we might explore the internet after Google

Can algorithms use collective knowledge to make us all internet explorers?

Photo credit: Amanda Tipton via Flickr
  • Google has come under scrutiny lately for its dominance over the flow of information on the internet.
  • TagTheWeb is researching a method to allow the "wisdom of the crowd" to categorize the internet more effectively.
  • With or without Google, the internet looks to change significantly in the future, in ways we may not be ready for.
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China implanted tiny spy chips in servers used by Amazon, Apple

A new report from Bloomberg describes how Chinese subcontractors secretly inserted microchips into servers that wound up in data centers used by nearly 30 American companies.

  • A 2015 security test of a server sold by an American company found that someone in the supply chain had successfully embedded a tiny microchip on a motherboard.
  • The company that manufactured the compromised motherboard provides servers to hundreds of international clients, including NASA and the Department of Homeland Security.
  • U.S. officials linked the hardware attack to a People's Liberation Army unit, though it's unclear what, if anything, hackers have done or to what they have access.
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