A technique to sift out the universe’s first gravitational waves

Identifying primordial ripples would be key to understanding the conditions of the early universe.

Photo by Denis Degioanni on Unsplash

In the moments immediately following the Big Bang, the very first gravitational waves rang out.

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Are we living in a baby universe that looks like a black hole to outsiders?

Baby universes led to black holes and dark matter, proposes a new study.

Credit: Kavli IPMU
  • Researchers recently used a huge telescope in Hawaii to study primordial black holes.
  • These black holes might have formed in the early days from baby universes and may be responsible for dark matter.
  • The study also raises the possibility that our own universe may look like a black hole to outside observers.
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How ‘heat death’ will destroy the universe

The expansion of the universe is speeding up—contrary to what many physicists expected. A "heat death" is coming, but it's not what you think.

  • The expansion of the universe is accelerating as the force of dark energy wins out over the pull of all the universe's collective gravity.
  • As every object in space moves farther and farther away from all other objects in space, the universe will reach a state of maximum entropy, and 'heat death' will ensue. As astrophysicist Dr. Katie Mack points out, heat death is not actually a hot phenomenon—it's also known as the "Big Freeze."
  • Around 100 billion years from now, the universe will have expanded so much that distant galaxies won't be visible from Earth, even with high-powered telescopes. Stars will disappear in a trillion years and new stars will no longer form. The "good" news is that humans probably won't be around to witness the machine as it breaks down and dies.
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The universe keeps dying and being reborn, claims Nobel Prize winner

Sir Roger Penrose claims our universe has been through multiple Big Bangs, with more coming.

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  • Roger Penrose, the 2020 Nobel Prize winner in physics, claims the universe goes through cycles of death and rebirth.
  • According to the scientist, there have been multiple Big Bangs, with more on the way.
  • Penrose claims that black holes hold clues to the existence of previous universes.
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3 wonders of the universe, explained

Astronomer Michelle Thaller schools us on what atoms really look, the Big Bang theory, and the speed of light.

  • Most people have seen atoms illustrated in textbooks and know about the Big Bang and the speed of light, but there is a good chance what you think you know is not scientifically accurate.
  • Michelle Thaller, an astronomer and Assistant Director for Science Communication at NASA, is here to clear up the misconceptions and explain why atoms don't actually look that way, why the Big Bang is a misnomer, and why the speed of light is more than just really fast.
  • Is there an edge of space? Does light experience time? Watch this video for answers to those and other interesting questions.

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