The universe is expanding faster than estimated, finds new study

The controversy over the universe's expansion rate continues with a new, faster estimate.

Credit: Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey
  • A new estimate of the expansion rate of the universe puts it at 73.3 km/sec/Mpc.
  • This is faster than the previous estimate of expansion in the early universe.
  • The discrepancy may mean fundamental theories need rethinking.
Keep reading Show less

Astrophysicists find unique "hot Jupiter" planet without clouds

A unique exoplanet without clouds or haze was found by astrophysicists from Harvard and Smithsonian.

Credit: M. Weiss/Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian
  • Astronomers from Harvard and Smithsonian find a very rare "hot Jupiter" exoplanet without clouds or haze.
  • Such planets were formed differently from others and offer unique research opportunities.
  • Only one other such exoplanet was found previously.
Keep reading Show less

The universe works like a huge human brain, discover scientists

A new study found similarities between the human brain and the cosmic network of galaxies.

Credit: natara / Adobe Stock
  • A new study finds similarities between the structures and processes of the human brain and the cosmic web.
  • The research was carried out by an astrophysicist and a neurosurgeon.
  • The two systems are vastly different in size but resemble each other in several key areas.
Keep reading Show less

Astrophysicists reconstruct the Milky Way's family tree

A team of astrophysicists used AI to figure out which clusters of stars merged to become our galaxy.

Credit: D. Kruijssen / Heidelberg University
  • Scientists use artificial intelligence to reconstruct the globular clusters that merged to form our Milky Way galaxy.
  • The researchers ran simulations on a neural network to discover the history and details about our galactic ancestors.
  • They found that a collision with a previous galaxy called "Kraken" was so powerful it transformed the Milky Way.
Keep reading Show less

Gamma-ray space telescope study may have spotted dark matter

New study of gamma rays and gravitational lensing points to the possible presence of dark matter.

NASA
  • Analyzing data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, researchers find hints of dark matter.
  • The scientists looked to spot a correlation between gravitational lensing and gamma rays.
  • Future release of data can pinpoint whether the dark matter is really responsible for observed effects.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast