Study identifies animal species that may be susceptible to coronavirus

On the list of animals at risk are several endangered species.

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  • SARS-CoV-2 enters our cells by binding with ACE2 receptors.
  • A study finds many animals may provide a similar point of entry for the infection.
  • COVID-19 has already been seen in a range of non-humans.

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  • A recent study examined the relationship between brain size and the development of motor skills across 36 primate species.
  • The researchers observed more than 120 captive primates in 13 zoos for over seven years.
  • The results suggest that primates follow rigid patterns in terms of which manipulative skills they learn first, and that the ultimate complexity of these skills depends on brain size.
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Evolution: That famous ‘march of progress’ image is just wrong

Some fish evolved legs and walked onto the land. Right?

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Evolution explains how all living beings, including us, came to be. It would be easy to assume evolution works by continuously adding features to organisms, constantly increasing their complexity.

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Who is a non-human person?

An orangutan has settled into a Florida home after a court granted her personhood rights. But what is the basis for personhood?

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  • An orangutan named Sandra was granted non-human personhood rights in 2015 and has been moved from the Buenos Aires Zoo to a home in Florida.
  • Legal personhood is not synonymous with human being. A "non-human person" refers to an entity that possesses some rights for limited legal purposes.
  • Sentience might be the characteristic necessary for granting legal rights to non-human species.
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New fossils suggest human ancestors evolved in Europe, not Africa

Experts argue the jaws of an ancient European ape reveal a key human ancestor.

  • The jaw bones of an 8-million-year-old ape were discovered at Nikiti, Greece, in the '90s.
  • Researchers speculate it could be a previously unknown species and one of humanity's earliest evolutionary ancestors.
  • These fossils may change how we view the evolution of our species.
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