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Yeet! As society changes, the dictionary gets weirder

English is a dynamic language, and this summer's new additions to dictionary.com tell us a lot about how we're living.

To boost the economy, treat the cause of aging

By slowing down aging, we could reap trillions of dollars in economic benefits.

Thanks to Iceland, the four-day workweek is coming

A new study from Iceland confirms that a shorter workweek improves productivity.

Study finds exactly how long people want to live: it isn’t forever

Biomedical science assumes that people want to live as long as possible. They don't.

DMT: the strongest psychedelic you’ve never heard of

Some scientists believe that DMT could revolutionize the treatment of depression.

Animal altruism: nature isn’t as cruel as the Discovery Channel says

One man studied apes for 50 years. He says nature isn't as cruel as you think.

Lab grown chicken nuggets makes cruelty-free meat possible

We eat 50 billion chickens every year. Is there a better way?

Fossilized dinosaur poop contains new insect species

Discovering fossilized insects is difficult, but a new find suggests a unique place to look.

Study: In college, quarters are better than semesters

Most schools use a semester system, but a new study suggests that they should switch to quarters.

3,000-year-old shark attack victim found

The skeleton of the world's oldest known shark attack victim exhibits telltale wounds.

New study darkens hope for Earth-like planets

Most planets can't host plant life.

Want to help animals? You might have to eat a few more

A virtuous diet isn't strictly vegan.

Air pollution linked to violent crime in Chicago

As air pollution increases, so does violent crime.

Don't be rude to your doctor. It might kill you.

Dealing with rudeness can nudge you toward cognitive errors.

How romantic love is like addiction

Might as well face it, you're addicted to love.

There never was a male fertility crisis

A new study suggests that reports of the impending infertility of the human male are greatly exaggerated.

No news is good news? Think again

Information economics suggests that "no news" means somebody is hiding something. But people are bad at noticing that.

Brain study strengthens link between lithium and suicide

A lithium imbalance appears linked to suicide.

First-of-its-kind flower smells like dead insects

Life finds a way — in this case, by smelling like death.

New AI-based theory explains your weird dreams

Dreams are weird. According to a new theory, that's what makes them useful.

Virtual reality warps your sense of time

Ever lose track of time while doing something? It gets worse with a VR headset on.

Your voice might reveal personality traits

The way you speak might reveal a lot about you, such as your willingness to engage in casual sex.

Modern society is as unequal as 14th century Europe

As bad as this sounds, a new essay suggests that we live in a surprisingly egalitarian age.

You are suffering from “tab overload”

Our love-hate relationship with browser tabs drives all of us crazy. There is a solution.

Study: You would spend 90 extra days in jail in a private prison

A new study suggests that private prisons hold prisoners for a longer period of time, wasting the cost savings that private prisons are supposed to provide over public ones.

Study: Dunbar’s number is wrong. You can have more than 150 friends

Dunbar's number is a popular estimate for the maximum size of social groups. But new research suggests that it's a fictitious number based on flimsy data and bad theory.

Baby's first poop predicts risk of allergies

Meconium contains a wealth of information.

Study: There are four types of Alzheimer’s disease

New research suggests that there is no "typical" form of Alzheimer's disease, as the condition can manifest in at least four different ways.

Blame evolution for human disease

For every good idea in evolution, there is an unintended consequence. Disease is often one of them.

Moral enhancement explained: Can science make us better people?

Could a pill make you more moral? Should you take it if it could?

Why American universities are the best in the world

American universities used to be small centers of rote learning, but three big ideas turned them into intellectual powerhouses.

Mysterious vomiting disease in dogs is due to novel coronavirus

A newly discovered coronavirus — but not the one that causes COVID-19 — has made some dogs very sick.

False positive: Exoplanets could have lots of oxygen but no life

Oxygen is thought to be a biomarker for extraterrestrial life, but there are at least three different ways that a lifeless planet can produce it.

Moral and economic lessons from Mario Kart

The design of a classic video game yields insights on how to address global poverty.

New study determines how many mothers have lost a child by country

Global inequality takes many forms, including who has lost the most children

Math explains polarization, and it's not just about politics

People often divide the world into "us" and "them" then forget about everybody else.

The four moral judgments you make every day

Our brains make snap moral decisions in mere seconds.

Rain, caves, and miracles: New study connects weather to ancient tales

A new study provides a possible scientific explanation for the existence of stories about ancient saints performing miracles with water.

13 films everyone should watch and why—as voted by you

A curated watchlist from Big Think readers.

Hidden dwarf galaxies revealed in first images of the "cosmic web"

Not only does this give us a look at the scaffolding of the universe, we found some new galaxies too!

Lightning may have provided a key mineral for early life on Earth

How do you get usable phosphorus into a system? A new study suggests lightning can do the trick.

Study measures marijuana's carbon footprint—and it's high

Growing marijuana in large, climate controlled warehouses is good for production but has a massive carbon footprint.

Incredible fossil shows dinosaur sitting on preserved nest of eggs

Fossils of ancient creatures doing anything are rare. This one is absolutely unique.

Plastic pollution from face masks could devastate the environment

Masks are great, but what happens when we try to throw out a billion masks at once?

Higher incomes tied to better emotional states — but there's a catch

A study of 1.6 million people ties high incomes with more positive emotions and fewer negative ones, but only towards the self.

Massive 'space hurricane' made of plasma rained electrons over North Pole

This storm rained electrons, shifted energy from the sun's rays to the magnetosphere, and went unnoticed for a long time.

Cephalopod aces 'marshmallow test' designed for eager children

The famous cognition test was reworked for cuttlefish. They did better than expected.

Classical liberalism and three of its founders: explained

Most people seem to enjoy liberalism and its spin offs, but what is it exactly? Where did the idea come from?

New wellness center lets guests cuddle with cows

Cow cuddling is getting ever more popular, but what's the science behind using animals for relaxation?

How philosophy blends physics with the idea of free will

How does philosophy try to balance having free will with living in a deterministic universe?

Japanese government appoints new "Minister of Loneliness"

While not the first such minister, the loneliness epidemic in Japan will make this one the hardest working.

Record for oldest DNA ever sequenced broken by mammoth remains

One million year old mammoth DNA more than doubles the previous record and suggests that even older genomes could be found.

Rousseau explained: What his philosophy means for us

The philosopher who praised a simple life and inspired the worst of the French Revolution.

New animation shows a billion years of continental drift

A new model of plate tectonics offers a chance to look back a billion years with new found accuracy.

New radar tech takes unbelievably detailed moon images from Earth

Radar astronomy is nothing new, but a new transmitter may give us unprecedented image resolution.

Risk-taking behavior has a unique and complex brain signature

How much of this can be linked to genetics?

Who were the most legendary ancient rulers of all time?

From Ramses II to Alexander the Great, these leaders helped shaped the world we know today.

Five collectibles with better returns than the stock market

People often make a killing in stocks, but there are other ways to potentially turn major profits.

Discovery of two giant radio galaxies hints at more to come

The newly discovered galaxies are 62 times bigger than the Milky Way.

A new essay takes a holistic look at the trolley problem

Knowing what to do is one thing, doing it is another.

Colorful brain mapping tool lights up neural connections

A powerful new tool lights up the brains of worms, and may soon help draw maps of other animals brains.

Survey shows Congress is more religious than America

A new survey shows who believes what and how it differs from what Americans believe as a whole.

New type of dual-acting antibiotic shows promise

A new antibiotic hits germs with a two pronged attack.

New DNA evidence rewrites Caribbean history

Two new studies shed light on who first inhabited the islands, who replaced them, and how few people lived there.

Anxiety and depression can affect your learning ability

An excessive focus on past failures can make learning about new situtations more difficult.

Interventions in school years can prevent "deaths of despair"

While most of these deaths are driven by external factors, interventions can still help prevent them.

Sixteen facial expressions appear in every culture

Other cultures can differ greatly from your own, but there are commonalties in the way we express emotions.

Astronomers have detected the first radio emissions from an exoplanet

Planets can emit radio waves. For the first time, we've picked them up from outside the solar system.

Researchers say food prices don’t reflect environmental costs

Agriculture is responsible for a quarter of greenhouse emissions, but who pays for these environmental costs?

13 books everyone should read and why—as voted by you

Add these great titles to your wish list or secure copies for yourself.

Ancient Puebloans used ice caves to survive droughts

Carbon dating allows us to know exactly when ice was melted for drinking water in pre-Columbian America.

Trial of a universal flu vaccine shows promise

The vaccine just passed its first clinical trials, but it has a long way to go.

Doctors in Canada to begin prescribing nature to patients

A new "evidence-based nature prescription program" will see patients spending time in the woods.

Plato’s utopia and why you don’t want to live there

History's first utopia shows how far we've come.

Lonely? Hungry? The same part of the brain worries about both

MRI scans show that hunger and loneliness cause cravings in the same area, which suggests socialization is a need.

How long does turkey take to thaw? There’s a calculator for that

Never made a turkey before? Don't worry, science can help.

Study finds matriarchal societies are good for women's health

A study of the Mosuo women, known for their matriarchy, suggests that gender roles can influence our health outcomes.

Isolated island group is now one of the world's largest animal sanctuaries

One of the world's most isolated island groups has just been made one of the world's largest ocean reserves.

Researchers use CT scans to digitally peek at ancient Egyptian mummies

All the fun of opening up a mummy, without the fear of unleashing a plague.

Soft fabric robot grips objects like an elephant's trunk

The new tool may someday be used in work that needs a light touch.

Some sleep is worse than no sleep for keeping fear in check

Getting plenty of sleep just became even more important.

Study warns of delayed flu outbreaks after pandemic ends

The positive steps we are taking to prevent disease might have a negative side effect.

Why you should cut back on social media and how to do it

Social media seems to stress some people out. Maybe its time for a break?

Should we pay ex-drug users to help them get clean?

What is more important, that a treatment helps keep people healthy or that it meshes with our morals?

What can we laugh at and why? The philosophy of humor

Everyone loves a laugh now and then, except for most of the philosophers you've heard of.

Study finds hard physical labor raises risk for dementia

Work that can break down the body can also break down the mind.

New study shows which states make it easier (or harder) to vote

States set their own voting laws, so where does this make voting easiest?

Liberal and conservative brains react to charged words differently

Partisanship can now be seen in brain scans.

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