Can reading erotica improve your sex life?

Is indulging in erotic content good or bad for your sex life?

Photo by Jacob Lund on Shutterstock
  • Erotica is defined as any type of art that is meant to cause sexual ideation or arousal. The main difference between erotica and pornography is that the former is seen as "art that has a sexual aspect."
  • While there are many different misconceptions about the consumption of erotic or pornographic content, many studies on this topic prove it may not be as harmful as you think.
  • Erotic literature can allow you to become more comfortable in your sexuality, communicate easier with your partner and may even impact your ability to orgasm.
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Write in style for life with this 100% inkless wooden stylus

Two famous Italian design companies joined forces to create this masterpiece.

  • Styluses date back to ancient Mesopotamia and are considered the original writing instruments.
  • With no lead, graphite, or ink cartridges, this stylus will last a lifetime without replacement parts.
  • Two top Italian design companies worked together to create this unique stylus.
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Jordan Klepper: Comedians vs. the apocalypse

Watch The Daily Show comedian Jordan Klepper and elite improviser Bob Kulhan live.

These days, if you don't laugh, you might just scream. Enter comedian and The Daily Show regular Jordan Klepper!

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How Hemingway felt about fatherhood

Parenting could be a distraction from what mattered most to him: his writing.

Ernest Hemingway Holding His Son 1927 (Wikimedia Commons)

Ernest Hemingway was affectionately called “Papa," but what kind of dad was he?

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Creativity: The science behind the madness

Human brains evolved for creativity. We just have to learn how to access it.

  • An all-star cast of Big Thinkers—actors Rainn Wilson and Ethan Hawke; composer Anthony Brandt; neuroscientists David Eagleman, Wendy Suzuki, and Beau Lotto; and psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman—share how they define creativity and explain how our brains uniquely evolved for the phenomenon.
  • According to Eagleman, during evolution there was an increase in space between our brain's input and output that allows information more time to percolate. We also grew a larger prefrontal cortex which "allows us to simulate what ifs, to separate ourselves from our location in space and time and think about possibilities."
  • Scott Barry Kaufman details 3 brain networks involved in creative thinking, and Wendy Suzuki busts the famous left-brain, right-brain myth.

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