Changing where you sit at work shown to boost creativity and innovation

New research at Carnegie Mellon University suggests a game of musical chairs.

Employees work at a Truck Alliance Inc. office in Chengdu, China, on Tuesday, April 11, 2017. Photographer: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
  • Carnegie Mellon assistant professor, Sunkee Lee, found that rearranging workstations led to higher profits and better communication.
  • Companies that only focus on short-term profits instead of long-term goals are less likely to innovate and grow.
  • Opening up new dialogues between workers resulted in greater problem solving and fewer problems.
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Technology & Innovation

The biggest change to manhood? Equal parenting.

Being a successful caregiver is part of today's definition of manhood.

  • The biggest example of a change in men's gendered behavior in recent years is the transformation of fatherhood. Nowadays, the definition of manhood has increasingly included being a present, and good caregiver.
  • Women have historically been burdened with childcare and housework. So much so that they usually longer off time off for parental leave. Also, they're the ones tending to take off work if their kid is sick. Because of this heavy role in parenting, many women have not been able to advance far in the workforce.
  • By men doing half of the care work, it's boosted women's empowerment. It's also great for children's emotional development and well-being. It's also great for men, too, because, as a result of being a successful caregiver, men are more likely to build up a sense of empathy, which can help them in leadership positions.
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700,000 people get out of prison each year. Let’s hire them.

The U.S. has a talent shortage and the formerly incarcerated have paid their debt to society. Let's solve two problems with one idea.

  • The U.S. has a talent shortage. There are 7.3 million open jobs, and only 6 million people currently looking for jobs, says President and CEO of SHRM Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.
  • The solution? Let the formerly incarcerated work good jobs that contribute to the economy.
  • SHRM research shows that 80% of HR managers are interested and willing to hire the formerly incarcerated. The bias exists at the employee and customer level – but that bias is changing fast for the better.
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Videos

Should architecture be taught in grade school?

Few students will become architects, but architecture may be able teach them more about real-life problem-solving than geometric proofs.

  • Contemporary schools are reconsidering their subjects and teaching methods in order to offer the best education for children.
  • Vicky Chan launched an architecture program designed to teach students STEM, creativity, sustainability,and problem-solving.
  • Chan is hardly alone; others have integrated new subjects and methods into curriculum, hoping to instill in students the skills necessary to be engaged, thoughtful citizens.
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Culture & Religion

Knowing how to behave in the #MeToo era

Harassment isn't about your intention. It's about your impact, explains Michael Kaufman.

  • In the #MeToo era, many men feel they're walking on eggshells and can't say anything anymore.
  • Companies must refocus their policies away from 1,000 page "don't do this" manuals and address the gray areas that are most confusing, like: Can you give a colleague a compliment?
  • Workplace harassment training should focus on the principle that sexual harassment is about impact of your words or actions; it's not about your intention.
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