Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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NASA's new project lets you take a simulated ride in a Mars rover

Help future Mars rovers better navigate the red planet's treacherous terrain.

NASA/JPL-Caltech
  • NASA just announced its AI4Mars project, which lets you can take a virtually simulated tour around Mars via the Curiosity rover.
  • The simulation project is calling on users to help the rover better classify the planet's sometimes dangerous terrain by labeling images taken by Curiosity.
  • This project gives you a chance to participate in enhancing the new machine learning approaches for exploring Mars and unveiling its secrets.
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NASA videos show what sunsets look like elsewhere in the galaxy

On other planets, blue skies and red sunsets aren't the norm.

NASA
  • A NASA scientist created animated simulations of how sunsets likely appear on Mars, Venus, Uranus, and Titan, Saturn's largest moon.
  • Sunsets appear differently on other planets because of differences in the atmosphere, which scatters light in unique ways.
  • Studying alien atmospheres helps scientists better understand atmospheric processes on Earth, and helps narrow the search for habitable planets.
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New 3D computer model shows how far a cough can spread indoors

This unsettling simulation shows how mucus-mist can rapidly spread in a grocery store.

  • Finnish researchers have shown how a single cough can blast small aerosolized saliva particles around a grocery store.
  • There is an ongoing scientific debate about how the novel coronavirus moves through the air.
  • The bigger risk when it comes to COVID-19 is the transmission of larger droplets through close contact with others (three feet or less).
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3 superb arguments for why we live in a matrix – and 3 arguments that refute them

Is this the real life or is it just fantasy? And does it really even matter?

Red pill or blue pill? Image source: Adobe Stock
  • The simulation argument was first put forth in a paper published in 2003 by philosopher Nick Bostrom.
  • Bostrom assigns less than a 50 percent probability that we're living in a simulated universe.
  • Some physicists believe that we can test this scientifically.
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Are We Living inside a Massive Computer Program?

Is our existence base reality—or are we pawns in a matrix? Cognitive scientist Joscha Bach explains how we might be able to tell.

Are we living in a video game? If so, the joke is on us, says cognitive scientist Joscha Bach. When people debate the possibility of human existence as a simulation, it's predominantly assumed that we are the players. Our overlord simulators are watching us, right? Well, that doesn't seem to gel with the amount of detail present in our world and the observable universe beyond. Why did our cosmic creators bother to code trillions of galaxies into the viewfinders of our telescopes? The Higgs boson, for example, is not necessary for our existence, so who would have the time to add such irrelevant frills just for our amusement (maybe the simulators had a really great intern that summer)? The answer? It's not made for us. According to Bach, if this is a simulation it's unlikely that we are the main attraction and much more realistic that the simulators wanted to make a model of a universe to explore hypothetical physics. That tiny blue dot with primates mixing concrete all over the surface? "We are just a random side effect or an artifact of the fact that evolution is possible in this universe," says Bach.

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