New surgery may help amputees control muscles and sense their 'phantom limb'

Reconnecting muscle pairs allows for better sensory feedback from the limb.

MIT News Office
MIT researchers have invented a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees to better control their residual muscles and sense where their "phantom limb" is in space.
Keep reading Show less

​These light-emitting "smart" tattoos could act as medical monitors

Light-emitting tattoos could indicate dehydration in athletes or health conditions in hospital patients.

Credit: Barsotti - Italian Institute of Technology
  • Researchers at UCL and IIT have created a temporary tattoo that contains the same OLED technology that is used in TVs and smartphones.
  • This technology has already been successfully applied to various materials including glass, food items, plastic, and paper packaging.
  • This advance in technology isn't just about aesthetics. "In healthcare, they could emit light when there is a change in a patient's condition - or, if the tattoo was turned the other way into the skin, they could potentially be combined with light-sensitive therapies to target cancer cells, for instance," explains senior author Franco Cacialli of UCL.
Keep reading Show less

The fastest drummer in the world is a cyborg

An accident left this musician with one arm. Now he is helping create future tech for others with disabilities.

  • Meet the world's first bionic drummer. Rock musician Jason Barnes lost his arm in a terrible accident... and then he became the fastest drummer in the world.
  • With the help of Gil Weinberg, a Georgia Tech professor and inventor of musical robots, the pair utilized electromyography and ultrasound technology to break musical records.
  • Weinberg and Barnes hope to perfect the technology so that it can one day be used to help other people with disabilities realize that "they're not only not disabled, they're actually super-able."
Keep reading Show less

A new hydrogel might be strong enough for knee replacements

Duke University researchers might have solved a half-century old problem.

Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images
  • Duke University researchers created a hydrogel that appears to be as strong and flexible as human cartilage.
  • The blend of three polymers provides enough flexibility and durability to mimic the knee.
  • The next step is to test this hydrogel in sheep; human use can take at least three years.
Keep reading Show less

Robo-boot concept promises 50% faster running

The old idea of running with springs on your feet gets a high-tech makeover.

Photo by Nicolas Hoizey on Unsplash
No matter how well designed, there are no running shoes that allow runners to keep up with cyclists.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast