New theories reveal the ferocious T-Rex as… adorable?

The American Museum of Natural History presents the new, more accurate T. rex.

  • Hatchling, four-year-old, and adult models show us new sides of the famous predator.
  • They're part of the T. rex: The Ultimate Predator exhibit running from March 2019 to August 2020.
  • Attention time travelers: You may want to pet the feathered hatchling. Don't.
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Surprising Science

Why millions of Americans didn’t vote during the midterms

Fall is a bad time to hold elections.

Photo credit: Joshua Lott / Getty Images
  • Usually, only about 40 percent of eligible voters participate in midterm elections.
  • Political philosopher John Stuart Mill believed it would be for the collective good if everybody voted.
  • Because of logistics, we may need to change the time of year we vote.
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Politics & Current Affairs
(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
  • CNN was evacuated live on air.
  • The targets of the bomb threats are frequently attacked by some in our political landscape.
  • It's unknown how many more suspicious packages are in the mail.
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Politics & Current Affairs

Elon Musk Says He Has Approval to Build a Hyperloop from New York to Washington

Superfast hyperloop travel gets closer to reality as Elon Musk receives "verbal" government approval for a route linking NYC and Washington.

In news that may finally make us feel like we’re living in the future, Elon Musk says he got a “verbal” approval from the government to build an underground Hyperloop between New York and Washington, D.C. A trip that would usually take three hours by train would be only 29 minutes in the 700 mph Hyperloop. The route would also cover Philadelphia and Baltimore. 

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Technology & Innovation

What It's Like to Be a Muslim-American Woman in the US Today

For the last two years the volume has risen on populist voices, culminating in a victory for President Trump. The day after his election, this is how "rude" New Yorkers treated one Muslim-American woman.

When she was nine years old, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh heard her first racial slur, from the mouth of one of her classmates. It was 2001, and 9/11 had just shocked and shattered the US's sense of safety. "I grew up through the worst forms of bullying, through an extremely low self-esteem, and it was very difficult for me to formulate who I was and what my identity meant to me," she says. So what was it like, 15 years later, being an American-Muslim woman in New York the day after President Trump was elected? Braced for the worst, Al-Khatahtbeh left her home and under the grey mood and matching skies of the day, was surprised by warm smiles and kind gestures from strangers in New York City. Even compliments on her headscarf. They were tiny exchanges that signified to her that there was a common understanding, and that hope was where it always has been — in other people.

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