Researchers unearth the “Lamborghini” of ancient chariots in Pompeii

The chariot survived ancient eruptions and modern-day looters to become a part of the world heritage site.

Credit: Luigi Spina, Archaeological Park of Pompeii
  • Archeologists recently discovered a first-of-its-kind chariot in Pompeii.
  • The ceremonial chariot is decorated with bronze and tin medallions, while the sides sport bronzesheets and red-and-black paintings.
  • Given looting activity in the area, it's lucky the 2,000-year-old treasure wasn't lost to the world heritage site.
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Researchers read centuries-old sealed letter without ever opening it

The key? A computational flattening algorithm.

Credit: David Nitschke on Unsplash

An international team of scholars has read an unopened letter from early modern Europe — without breaking its seal or damaging it in any way — using an automated computational flattening algorithm.

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New Google AR exhibits let you see prehistoric creatures up close

Google's Arts & Culture app just added a suite of prehistoric animals and NASA artifacts that are viewable for free with a smartphone.

Google Arts & Culture
  • The exhibits are viewable on most smartphones through Google's free Arts & Culture app.
  • In addition to prehistoric animals, the new exhibits include NASA artifacts and ancient artwork.
  • The Arts & Culture app also lets you project onto your walls famous paintings on display at museums around the world.
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Listen: Scientists re-create voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian mummy

Scientists used CT scanning and 3D-printing technology to re-create the voice of Nesyamun, an ancient Egyptian priest.

  • Scientists printed a 3D replica of the vocal tract of Nesyamun, an Egyptian priest whose mummified corpse has been on display in the UK for two centuries.
  • With the help of an electronic device, the reproduced voice is able to "speak" a vowel noise.
  • The team behind the "Voices of the Past" project suggest reproducing ancient voices could make museum experiences more dynamic.
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New theories reveal the ferocious T-Rex as… adorable?

The American Museum of Natural History presents the new, more accurate T. rex.

  • Hatchling, four-year-old, and adult models show us new sides of the famous predator.
  • They're part of the T. rex: The Ultimate Predator exhibit running from March 2019 to August 2020.
  • Attention time travelers: You may want to pet the feathered hatchling. Don't.
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