Why radicals can't recognize when they're wrong

It's not just ostriches who stick their head in the sand.

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  • Not only does everyone have personal experience with how difficult it can be to change people's minds, but there's also empirical research showing why this is the case.
  • A new study in Current Biology explains why some people seem to be constitutionally incapable of admitting they're wrong.
  • The study shows the underlying mechanism behind being bull-headed, and there may be some ways to get better at recognizing when you're wrong.
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Microdoses of LSD change how you perceive time

A study on the effects of LSD microdosing shows some fittingly strange results.

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  • A new study offers some of the first evidence that microdosing – taking tiny, regular doses of LSD – does have measurable effects.
  • Subjects taking LSD were less accurate when estimating how long an image appeared on a screen than subjects who were sober.
  • The mechanism that causes this effect remains unknown, but several ideas have been put forward.
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  • The body influences the mind: physical activity changes our brain chemistry.
  • More activity in the body, and therefore in the brain, reorients us toward happiness, purpose, and meaning.
  • Neuroplasticity suggests we can program ourselves to be more optimistic and hopeful.
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Habits come from what we do, not what we want to do

A new study takes a fresh look at the mechanics of forming habits.

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  • A new study suggests repetition is the key to developing a new habit.
  • The study bases its conclusions on the habits of digital rodents.
  • Just keep at it — go to the gym, floss — and the desired habit will eventually stick.
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200 cognitive biases rule our everyday thinking

Almost 200 cognitive biases rule our everyday thinking. A new codex boils them down to 4.

  • Nearly 200 cognitive biases affect our decision-making.
  • The sheer amount of biases should teach us humility.
  • And we should recognize the essential role they play in life, as well.
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