How to suffer like a total pro: Pete Holmes on ego, judgment, and feeling special

Suffering can buffer us, and make us more polished versions of ourselves — if we have the right attitude.

  • When you're going through a moment that tests your patience, even causes you to psychologically suffer, sometimes you have to step back and say, "Yes, thank you."
  • Suffering is like sandpaper, and, if we choose, it can buffer us and make us better versions of ourselves.
  • Also, it's critical to find a quiet place within where just the fundamental fact that you are participating in reality imbues you with enough value and dignity to draw upon at any moment. Regardless of exterior sentiments about you.
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Why should you always assume you're wrong? Science.

When it comes to scientific theory, (or your personal life) be sure to question everything.

  • The theories we build to navigate the world, both scientifically and in our personal lives, all contain assumptions. They're a critical part of scientific theory.
  • Cognitive psychologist Donald Hoffman urges us to always question those assumptions. In this way, by challenging ourselves, we come to a deeper understanding of the task at hand.
  • Historically, humans have come to some of our greatest discoveries by simply questioning assumed information.
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Does digital technology make students stupid?

Conventional wisdom believes "screen time" disrupts mental development, but research hints at a more complicated relationship between our minds and digital technology.

  • Worry over test scores has led many to blame digital technology for waning educational achievement.
  • New studies show that the persistent effects of "screen time" are not yet understood and may be short-lived.
  • Many experts argue the best approach is to teach students the strategic and selective use of digital technology.
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Listening to gospel music 'unexpectedly' linked to several maladaptive traits

Before you judge someone's personality based in their playlist, you may want to read the results of this study.

  • New research predicts links between music and film preferences and recent models of unhealthy and psychopathic personality traits.
  • A study on 379 participants found that conservative music tastes and a preference for faith-based movies that were the most strongly correlated to dysfunctional personality traits.
  • Psychopathy's component of "boldness" corresponded to enjoyment of rhythmic beats, like R&B and party music.
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How to cope under pressure, according to psychology

What's your "stress mindset"?

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You're preparing for an important meeting, and the pressure's on. If it's bad now, how will you cope when you actually have to perform? Will you fly? Or will you sink?

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