Most of today’s teens are easy prey to fake facts

An international study finds the vast majority of 15-year-olds can't tell when they're being manipulated.

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  • International reading tests administered in 79 countries find most teens to be gullible when consuming information.
  • As learning has moved online, absolutely reliable sources have become scarce.
  • Most teens can't detect the validity of supposed "facts" from contextual clues.
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Top-down power: Hierarchies thrive on the internet

The internet was built to resist an Orwellian future. Now it's being weaponized.

  • Research shows hierarchical groups are more likely to use the internet as a platform.
  • This might be counterintuitive, as the original rise of the internet coincided with events like the toppling of top-down structures.
  • Despite the strong belief that the internet is horizontal, these hierarchical systems achieve high levels of online participation.
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How bland positive messages help Russian trolls spread disinformation

The Internet Research Agency has learned that you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.

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  • When we read examples of fake news headlines from the 2016 election, they seem blatantly false.
  • However, the data shows that most Russian trolls were mostly sharing posts meant to camouflage their actions, with a small percentage of posts sharing fake headlines.
  • As the 2020 elections approach, researchers are discovering that Russian trolls are becoming more sophisticated and savvy in how they spread disinformation.
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Bring your digital content to the next level with this amazing deal from Scopio

Image ownership and copyright law are huge considerations for anyone producing digital content these days. Scopio offers hundreds of royalty-free images for use anywhere for any purpose.

  • Scopio provides a massive library of royalty-free images for use.
  • Photographs can be used anywhere from websites to social media accounts to ads.
  • New images are added daily.
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Billions of fake accounts: Who's messaging you on Facebook?

The social media company's recent transparency report claimed that it had taken down a staggering number of fake accounts — but it's unlikely they're catching them all.

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  • Facebook's recent transparency report revealed that it took down 5.4 billion accounts in 2019 thus far, a huge jump from 2018's 3.3 billion removals.
  • Facebook claims that this jump in take-downs is due to improved methods for identifying fake accounts, but it has to be assumed that some are still slipping through the cracks.
  • What are the primary activities of these fake accounts?
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