Hashtag politics: 4 key ways digital activism is inegalitarian

Many believe that the internet has made it easier for us to participate in political activism. But is that really true?

  • Protesting in person is costly in terms of money and resources; some people have children to take care of, jobs that can't be away from, or may not have time to attend a planning event.
  • The internet was supposed to be a way to sidestep this barrier to political activism. But this doesn't consider the other barriers preventing poor and working-class folks from participating in digital activism.
  • In particular, these people lack ASETs: access to computers, the skills to use them, the empowerment necessary to feel that using Twitter or other social media is for them, and the time to make use of digital platforms in an effective way.
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Nearly one-fourth of young adults are looking for love through dating websites or apps.

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Should Facebook be regulated with laws instead of fines?

The fine Facebook just paid was huge, but many in tech say it wasn't nearly enough to protect your data.

Avishek Das/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Image
  • Last week, Facebook incurred a five billion dollar fine as a result of its mismanagement of user data.
  • This is the second largest fine the FTC has ever given out.
  • Many in tech are arguing that this was a mere slap on the wrist and that stronger regulation is needed.
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  • Bitcoin has long been the king of the cryptocurrency market.
  • New coins and tokens have shaken up the status quo with unique use cases and innovations.
  • Bitcoin has responded with its own improvements, leading to a healthier market.
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American kids today dream of being vloggers, not astronauts

The dream of space travel has been usurped by superficiality.

  • Recent survey of 3,000 kids showed that more kids aspire to be a YouTube star than an astronaut.
  • Children in the U.S. and U.K. were three times more likely to want to become vloggers than kids in China.
  • The survey also indicated that kids in America were less knowledgeable about space travel than their global counterparts.
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