How is the passion economy changing the way we look at jobs?

The rules have changed, and so have we.

  • The widget economy has given way to something entirely different: the passion economy.
  • Whereas the previous economy was fueled by mass production and homogeneity, growth in the passion economy involves more specialized products that less people want more intensely.
  • This shift creates more dynamic, less linear career paths that evolve and change as you do. Ultimately, this will lead to more fulfilling and better paid work.

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Bennett Foddy's free browser games are the exercise your brain needs

This video game designer's creations have been said to work "neurological magic."

Photo Credit: Foddy.net
  • Video game designer Bennett Foddy's games hack players' neurology to allow them to embody the subjects on the screen.
  • Foddy plays with perceptions of sensation to explore how gamers "become" the digital characters.
  • Research indicates that video games can change how our brains perform and their structural makeup. For instance, enhancing several kinds of focus.
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The tech shift: Push politicians for answers, and develop your digital literacy

Tech is rising and America's middle class is vanishing. Here's what to do.

  • The rise of new technologies is making the United States more economically unequal, says Professor Ramesh Srinivasan. Americans should be pushing the current presidential candidates hard for answers on how they will bring economic security and how they will ensure that technological transitions benefit all of us.
  • "We are at an inflection point when it comes to top-down control over very many different aspects of our lives through privatized corporate power over technology," says Srinivasan. Now is the time to debate solutions like basic income and worker-owned cooperatives.
  • Concurrently, individuals should develop digital literacy and get educated on the potential solutions. Srinivasan recommends taking free online and open courses from universities like Stanford and MIT, and reading books and quality journalism on these issues.
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The internet’s top 12 coronavirus-related questions, answered

Flattening the curve on panic and disinformation.

  • With mixed messages coming from our leaders, Americans have turned to the internet to answer their COVID-19 questions.
  • We explore the top 12 coronavirus questions, according to Google Trends.
  • When seeking answers, it is important to prioritize evidence-based information from credible sources.

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Busting the myth of ‘neutral’ AI

We encode our biases into everything we create: books, poems, and AI. What does that means for an increasingly automated future?

  • AI isn't "just technology," says Professor Ramesh Srinivasan. We have to bust the myth that AI is neutral and has no biases. We encode our biases into artificial intelligence. That fact will become more apparent as 5G 'smart cities' become a reality.
  • Business leaders must develop awareness and ask themselves: What are the data sets my technologies are learning from and what are the values that are influencing the development of these technologies?
  • The American public, across every demographic and both sides of the aisle, supports doing something about big technology issues that are creating an unequal future, says Srinivasan. We are at an inflection point, and good AI is possible if tech leaders act on these issues.
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