What's worse than drug addiction? The cruelty of drug treatments.

Drug treatment centers pose potential threats to drug addicts.

  • Many drug treatment centers are run as for-profit institutions. Making a buck off of treating people's addictions often runs counter to actually helping addicts.
  • Some Chinese drug centers are experimenting with removing an addict's nucleus accumbens, which saps them of their ability to feel pleasure.
  • The solution to drug addiction may be creating better drugs to use, says author and journalist Maia Szalavitz.
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Is James Bond an alcoholic?

A scientific study of the legendary drinker.

(MGM)
  • A new study analyzes the possibility that Bond has a problem.
  • The lethal super spy generally rocks a killer blood-alcohol level.
  • What's actually so cool about this guy?
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Is wasp venom the next healthcare revolution?

MIT researchers have discovered how to turn wasp venom into an antibiotic.

(Photo by Dr. Peter J Bryant/University of California, Irvine)
  • Researchers are looking at the venom of wasps, bees, and arachnids to develop life-saving medical therapies.
  • Researchers at MIT created synthetic variants of a peptide found in wasp venom that proved an effective antibiotic.
  • With the "post-antibiotic era" looming, synthetic peptides could provide a way to maintain global health initiatives.
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Cushioned shoes aren't good for your feet

More and more research points to a serious mistake we made in how biomechanics works.

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images
  • A new study from Helsinki found that the more you cushion your feet, the more likely you'll get injured.
  • This follows previous studies showing that cushioned shoes leave you more susceptible to pain and injury.
  • A few million years of evolutionary design has been usurped by shoe marketing campaigns.
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Scientists create 10-minute test that can detect cancer anywhere in the body

The quick test would be a breakthrough in cancer treatment.

Adding healthy DNA to the pink water full of gold particles turns it blue, but when cancerous DNA is added, the water remains pink (University of Queensland).
  • Australian researchers find 3D nanostructures that are unique to cancer cells.
  • These markers can be identified using technology that may be available on cell phones.
  • Human clinical trials are next for the team.
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