Humans were born to run. Exoskeletons might make us better at it.

New research on ankle exoskeletons show promising results.

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  • New research from Stanford finds that motor-powered ankle exoskeletons conserve 15 percent of energy expenditure when running.
  • Spring-powered exoskeletons without motors actually made running harder.
  • The researchers hope to develop better spring-powered models moving forward.
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Why we need to restrict calories right now

A new study shows the benefits of calorie restriction. Never has such advice been more needed.

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  • A new study based at Salk Institute has discovered the cellular mechanisms behind calorie restriction.
  • Rats on a higher-calorie diet experienced more inflammation and immune problems than rats that ate less.
  • This research is especially relevant right now, as immunodeficient patients are at high risk of complications from COVID-19.
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People with large brain reserves can circumvent Alzheimer's. Here's how to build yours.

It's never too late to start strengthening your brain.

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  • Cognitive reserve is your mind's ability to resist damage to your brain.
  • Brain reserve refers to the brain structures that provide resilience against neurodegenerative diseases.
  • A certain number of people with Alzheimer's pathology never show symptoms; there are methods for developing this skill.
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The art of walking: How this everyday act can bring you inner peace

Here's how to exercise your curiosity and truly experience the world.

  • "[T]oday, most people are sitting on their arses in a chair looking at the screen to discover and explore the world," says Norwegian explorer Erling Kagge. "And that's a huge misunderstanding. You're missing out on some of the greatest things in life."
  • There is an inner silence to be found through walking, says Kagge. You exercise your curiosity and the movement of your body, which are two ancient and important things for Homo sapiens.
  • Some people experience silence through meditation, mindfulness, or yoga. But Kagge emphasizes that you don't need any formal techniques. If you are interested in finding inner silence, you can create it anywhere, just by walking.
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Whose limb is it anyway? On the ethics of body-part disposal

Those who have experienced amputations often wonder what happened to their limb after surgery.

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Our limbs can be a crucial part of our sense of self and identity, so amputation is often traumatic to the emotional and psychological wellbeing of patients.
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