Sex study explores 'bad' orgasms

Orgasms don't always mean a sexual encounter is positive, find psychologists.

  • A new study finds that reaching an orgasm doesn't always indicate the sexual encounter was pleasurable.
  • A variety of reasons were reported by participants for "bad" orgasms.
  • Communication is key to improving sexual experiences, maintain the scientists.
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Why older people should be allowed to change their legal age

Discrimination against people because of their age is a real phenomenon.

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Let's say that on average you are in better shape than other people of your age. You are more able than them: quicker, sprightlier, livelier.

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5 of history's strangest scientific theories

Rest assured: Kooky ideas like the Earth being flat or vaccines causing autism are nothing new. Humanity has had worse ideas before.

Wellcome Library no. 11847i Photo number: V0011119
  • The line between science and strongly held belief was not always so clear-cut as it is today.
  • In the past, many quacks, charlatans, or well-intentioned philosophers have developed theories that strike us as obviously untrue today.
  • But hindsight is 20/20: People really had no idea how the world actually worked in the past.
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What is free will, really? Steven Pinker explains.

The processes behind our ability to make decisions are complex, but they're not miracles.

  • Free will exists, but by no means is it a miracle.
  • We use "free will" to describe the more complex processes by which behavior is selected in the brain. These neurological steps taken to make decisions respect all laws of physics.
  • "Free will wouldn't be worth having or extolling, in moral discussions, if it didn't respond to expectations of reward, punishment, praise, blame," Pinker says.
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How a Nobel Prize winner moves from data to discovery

How do you develop the next big idea? You pull together people who are both curious and passionate.

  • In 2018, Dr. Jim Allison was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for discovering an effective way to attack cancer through immunology.
  • In pursuing this discovery, he recruited other scientists who were curious, who cared about and were committed to science. "You have to put up with a lot of failure, 'cause if you're not, you're probably doing boring stuff," Allison says.
  • When it comes to developing a theory that works, it's critical to ask as many people as possible on a project for their hypotheses on why a particular outcome may take place. By pulling together these ideas, and testing them, better data can be accumulated.
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