Eating fish may have given Neanderthals brain power

A new finding suggests that Neanderthals were far from the big dumb brutes we make them out to be.

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  • Scientists have found evidence that the Neanderthals were eating large amounts of fish long before modern humans got to Europe.
  • Previously, it was thought that only modern humans were fishing on a large scale.
  • The findings show that the Neanderthals were more like us than most people think.
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New tech reduces salt without compromising taste

Novel food processing tech promises to lower sodium content without reducing flavor intensity.

  • Current food processing technology reduces flavor intensity and requires much additional salt.
  • New tech from Washington State University promises to reduce sodium content without affecting flavor.
  • Too much salt consumption can lead to a host of illnesses.
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3 ethical catastrophes you can help stop, right now

Deciding how we ought to live is one of the greatest challenges of being alive. Ask yourself these important questions to gain clarity, with philosopher Peter Singer.

  • Philosopher Peter Singer cites his top three ethical issues in the world today as: extreme poverty; climate change, which is related to poverty; and the way humans treat animals.
  • Any rational being should be interested in trying to understand how they ought to live, and whether they are doing things that are right or wrong. Singer suggests asking yourself important questions. When it comes to extreme poverty, ask: "Is it okay for me just to be living my life in my society and not doing anything for people who, through no fault of their own, are living in extreme poverty?"
  • For climate change, ask how you can put pressure on political leaders to take serious steps to prevent a climate change catastrophe that will disproportionately affect the poor. When it comes to animal cruelty, ask: "Am I complicit in the suffering that's being inflicted on animals, especially in factory farms but in other forms of farming as well? Am I complicit in that when I buy those products? And, if so, does that mean that I need to stop buying them?"
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Red meat causes heart disease. Except when it doesn’t?

One study says reduce red meat consumption; another says enjoy. Which should we believe?

  • A recent meta-analysis found red and processed meats increased the risk of developing heart disease by 3–7 percent.
  • The study comes just months after an infamous review claimed Americans did not need to change their meat-eating ways.
  • The problem is not scientific consensus, but how specialists analyze risk when proffering public guidelines.
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American families waste a third of the food they purchase

On average, American households dump the equivalent of $1,900 worth of food a year.

(Photo: Unsplash)
  • A recent study finds that the average American household wastes a third of its food.
  • All told, the U.S. food system squanders billions of pounds of consumable food every year, amounting to billions more in economic losses.
  • Improved meal management can help Americans save the money thrown out with their food.
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