Nutrisystem review: The key to losing weight—and keeping it off

Nutrisystem is a smarter weight-loss program that users enjoy.

Credit: Nutrisystem
  • The societal and economic consequences of obesity cannot be ignored.
  • The economic impact is up to $190 billion every year in America.
  • Americans spend up to $2.5 billion each year on popular weight-loss programs.
Keep reading Show less

From NASA to your table: A history of food from thin air

A fairly old idea, but a really good one, is about to hit the store shelves.

Credit: Brian McGowan/Unsplash/mipan/Adobe Stock/Big Think
  • The idea of growing food from CO2 dates back to NASA 50 years ago.
  • Two companies are bringing high-quality, CO2-derived protein to market.
  • CO2-based foods provide an environmentally benign way of producing the protein we need to live.
Keep reading Show less

Startup looks to begin pig-to-human organ transplants by 2022

Porcine gene edits may allow such transplants without rejection.

Credit: Phoenix Han on Unsplash
  • A company called Revivicor has received clearance from the FDA to use their genetically modified pigs for medical use or as food.
  • The pigs lack genes for alpha-gal sugar, which human bodies reject.
  • Revivicor anticipates the first human transplant trials as early as this year.
Keep reading Show less

The evolution of comfort food

An archaeologist considers the history and biology of what defines a taste of home.

Photo by Zera Li on Unsplash
The winter holiday season will feel different this year for many: Extended families may not be able to gather, leaving holiday meals shared with smaller groups, or digitally, across different time zones.
Keep reading Show less

Researchers say food prices don’t reflect environmental costs

Agriculture is responsible for a quarter of greenhouse emissions, but who pays for these environmental costs?

Credit: Gratisography at Pexels
  • A new study shows that food products fail to include their environmental costs in their price.
  • If meat products included the cost of their carbon footprints, their prices would more than double.
  • Policies to factor in these costs could change food consumption in ways that lower carbon emissions.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast