7 ways to flirt that are backed by science

When it comes to flirting, love meters have nothing on these researchers' findings.

(Photo from Wikimedia)
  • Flirting is an important part of life. It can be a fun, adventurous way to meet others and develop intimate relationships.
  • Many people find flirting to be an anxiety-ridden experience, but science can help us discover principles to be more relaxed while flirting.
  • Smiling and eye contact are proven winners, while pick-up lines are a flirty fallacy.
Keep reading Show less

Intimacy and sexual desire in couples can be heightened by this practice

Researchers discover a link between nonverbal synchronization and relationship success.

Pixabay
  • Scientists say coordinating movements leads to increased intimacy and sexual desire in a couple.
  • The improved rapport and empathy was also observed in people who didn't know each other.
  • Non-verbal clues are very important in the development stages of a relationship.
Keep reading Show less

Stand up straight! Scientists have found 'posture' cells

Scientists have discovered that neurological response to posture is separate from movement.

Photo: Andrew Nourse / flickr
  • Increasingly bad posture is being seen due to phone usage and other bad habits.
  • Researchers have discovered "posture cells" that can be isolated from movement.
  • This could have a profound effect on our understanding of body schema.
Keep reading Show less

How to tell if someone’s bluffing: body language lessons from a poker pro

Want to predict someone's next move, or know if someone is telling you a lie? Learn to read body language like a poker pro.

A good poker face can win you a fortune or help you sell a difficult lie, but that term might be leading us all astray. For poker champ Liv Boeree, calling someone's bluff isn't about their face at all, it's often much more about their body as a whole—and one part in particular. "The feet are often the most reliable thing to look at on your opponent because they might be completely stoic in their face but their feet are bouncing around," she says. We're all hyper aware of our faces as a primary point of communication, but our bodies are speaking more loudly than we may realize. Typically, "the lower down on the body that you're looking at, the more reliable the information," she says. Keep in mind, reading body language is an art not a science, but thanks to Boeree's years of experience at the poker table she highlights some classic behaviors of bluffers, and reliable strategies for those who want to call them out. Find more from Liv Boeree at www.livboeree.com.

This Simple Trick Will Help You Read People's Emotions More Accurately

It seems intuitive that the best way to interpret how others are feeling would be to both see and hear how they’re behaving. However, a new study suggests that’s dead wrong.

Keep reading Show less