Increasing numbers of people are in pain. How do we cope?

A new study reminds us that physical and emotional pain are not far apart.

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  • Physical and emotional pain are not that distinct, given that both are routed through a single brain region.
  • A new study at NYU shows that physical pain can lessen the effects of depression and emotional duress.
  • Holistic methods for dealing with both physical and emotional pain should be considered.
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Could invisible aliens really exist among us? An astrobiologist explains

The intelligent life we are searching for doesn't have to be humanoid.

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Life is pretty easy to recognise. It moves, it grows, it eats, it excretes, it reproduces.

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Our bodies are chronically in "threat mode"—but being kind recalibrates our nervous system

Being kind to others positively impacts your physical and mental health, according to this groundbreaking research by Stanford professor Dr. James Doty.

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  • The default "rest mode" of our brains is often taken over by a "threat mode" setting because of our stressful, "on-the-go" lifestyles. When we are chronically in threat mode, this leaves us with less capacity for compassion.
  • Showing compassion or acting kind to others can actually change your physiology, taking you out of threat mode and putting you back into your natural "rest and digest" mode.
  • Research by a well-known Stanford professor Dr. James Doty has shown that acts of kindness or compassion that put us back into our "rest mode" can have lasting positive impacts on our physical and mental health.
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Tardigrades' kryptonite? Climate change.

Not so indestructible after all.

  • Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are microscopic creatures best known for their ability to withstand a variety of extreme conditions, such as high heat, extreme cold, high pressure, and even the vacuum of space.
  • However, new research shows that the famously durable creatures aren't so robust against the long-term heat of climate change.
  • The findings underscore how fundamentally humans have affected life at every level.
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Biologists extend worm lifespan by 500% in surprising discovery on aging

A new study shows that altering the ISS and TOR pathways in roundworms can extend lifespan by 500 percent.

  • The experiment was conducted on C. elegans, a nematode species often used in research on aging.
  • Humans evolved with the same cellular pathways, suggesting that the findings might help inform anti-aging therapies for humans.
  • The new study focuses on the role that mitochondria play in the aging process.
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