Want to Find Yourself? Try Playing Dungeons & Dragons.

Role for insight.

Want to Find Yourself? Try Playing Dungeons & Dragons.


Video games wish they had the same creative freedom as Dungeons & Dragons. Gamers may be able to create their gender, race, and class, but they'll never be able to grow and test their personalities in the way tabletop role-playing games allow.

“Ultimately, [D&D] tantalizes its players with what seems like a very American promise: that each of us can be the master of our own dungeon,” Jon Michaud writes for The New Yorker.

Director Jon Favreau once said that he credits Dungeons & Dragons for giving him "a really strong background in imagination, storytelling, understanding how to create tone, and a sense of balance."

When asked what his cultural influences were, The Atlantic blogger Ta-Nehisi Coates explained to Big Think that “the first things that taught [him] about how words were beautiful [were], hip-hop and Dungeons and Dragons.”

</p> <p>***</p> <p><em>Natalie has been writing professionally for about 6 years. After graduating from Ithaca College with a degree in Feature Writing, she snagged a job at PCMag.com where she had the opportunity to review all the latest consumer gadgets. Since then she has become a writer for hire, freelancing for various websites. In her spare time, you may find her riding her motorcycle, reading YA novels, hiking, or playing video games. Follow her on Twitter: @nat_schumaker</em></p> <p>Photo Credit: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/smswigart/6807272495/" target="_blank">Scott Swigart/Flickr</a></p> <div class="attribution-info"> </div><div class="view follow-view clear-float photo-attribution" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1446750315052_16326"><span class="relationship"> </span></div>

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Magdalene Visaggio via Twitter
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Credit: Inspection Générale des Carrières, 1857 / Public domain
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