Impossible Whopper, the 'meatless burger,' is coming to every Burger King nationwide

Everyone in the United States will soon have a chance to try plant-based burgers.

Impossible Foods / Burger King
  • The plant based "Impossible Whopper" by Impossible Foods will be available August 8th nationwide at all Burger Kings.
  • The Impossible Burger is one of the most popular "meatless meat" options in the industry.
  • Americans are increasingly becoming more interested in alternative options for meat.
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(Photo by Jeff Schear/Getty Images for McDonald's)

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