Chemistry for kids: Make a DIY bubble snake!

A fun and completely safe experiment for the family to try during quarantine.

  • Most of us are staying home to help flatten the curve of COVID-19, but that doesn't mean there isn't learning and fun to be had.
  • It's important to take a break from screen time. Kate the Chemist, professor, science entertainer, and author of "The Big Book of Experiments," has just the activity: Creating a bubble snake using common household ingredients including dish soap, food coloring, rubber bands, a towel, and a small plastic bottle.
  • In this step-by-step tutorial, Kate walks us through the simple process of building the apparatus and combining materials to bring the fun snakes to life.

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Tech hack: These 4 steps will make your phone less distracting

Simple tricks for hacking back your device.

  • Smartphones are double edged swords. They are great tools for connecting people around the world, but they also often get in the way of productivity.
  • One four-step strategy for taking back control is the Four R's: Remove, Replace, Reorganize, and Reclaim.
  • By changing a few notifications settings and removing non-essential applications, you can completely transform your relationship with your device.

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Emma is like a fitness tracker for your finances, and it's over 80% off now

Get your finances in shape with this powerful money manager.

  • Emma is a personal finance and budgeting app to help you better control your money.
  • Emma organizes and analyzes all your financial accounts to save you cash.
  • A $299.99 lifetime subscription is on sale now for just $39.
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My month trying out Marie Kondo's Method

It was a good month.

Socks and tights are seen arranged in a drawer in small boxes at a home in Washington, DC, as recommended by Japanese tidying expert Marie Kondo, creator of the 'KonMari' method, on January 18, 2019. (Photo: Caitlin Wilson/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Marie Kondo's 2014 book, The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up, has sold over 9 million copies.
  • The Japanese organizer's success has turned into a popular Netflix show, Tidying Up With Marie Kondo.
  • De-cluttering your home has an emotional resonance, says Kondo.
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Are you an overbuyer or an underbuyer?

One way to limit clutter is by being mindful of your spending.

  • Overbuyers are people who love to buy — they stockpile things as a result. These are individuals who are prone to run out of space in trying to store their stuff and they may even lose track of what — and how much of what — they have.
  • One way overbuyers can limit their waste, both money and space wise, is by storing items at the store, and then buy them when they really need them.
  • Underbuyers tend to go to extraordinary lengths to not buy things. They save money and do fewer errands, however, they often make do with shabby personal items. They may also, when they finally decide to go out to buy a product, go without entirely because the item may no longer be available.
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