Wealth inequality is literally killing us. The economy should work for everyone.

This economy has us in survival mode, stressing out our bodies and minds.

  • Economic hardship is linked to physical and psychological illness, resulting in added healthcare expenses people can't afford.
  • The gig economy – think Uber, Lyft, TaskRabbit, Handy – is marketed as a 'be your own boss' revolution, but it can be dehumanizing and dangerous; every worker is disposable.
  • The cooperative business model can help reverse wealth inequality.
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Why insecure people buy more things

Money may not buy you love, but it won't break your heart either.

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  • The link between a poor interpersonal life and materialism has been known for decades, but the exact reason for this connection hasn't been clear.
  • New research shows that two problematic attachment styles can push people towards seeking the love and affection they crave in material wealth.
  • The study shows both how broken-hearted people use materialism as a crutch and how this dependency can be reversed.
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Marriott data breach hits 500 million guests. Here’s what to do if you’re one of them.

It's likely one of the biggest data breaches in corporate history.

Sheraton
  • The breach dates back to 2014 and potentially affected 500 million customers.
  • Millions of guests potentially had credit card information stolen.
  • It's likely the second largest data breach in corporate history.
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The blockchain phone is coming... but what does this mean?

What is a blockchain phone, and why would anyone want one?

Image: Shutterstock/Big Think
  • Sirin Labs' Finney and the HTC's Exodus are set to become the first blockchain phones on the market.
  • In the long-term, blockchain phones could be used to increase our security and shift the control of our data away from large corporations back to the individual users.
  • In the future, it is likely that the concept could become mainstream due to the benefits it provides.
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What people smuggle onto airplanes and why

Most of those who try to sneak stuff onboard succeed.

(James R. Martin/Shutterstock)
  • 32.4% American travelers try to sneak forbidden items onboard.
  • 87.7% of them succeed.
  • It's mostly about recreational drugs, but also about explosives, poisons, and infectious items.
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