Should law enforcement be using AI and cell phone data to find rioters?

The attack on the Capitol forces us to confront an existential question about privacy.

Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images
  • The insurrection attempt at the Capitol was captured by thousands of cell phones and security cameras.
  • Many protestors have been arrested after their identity was reported to the FBI.
  • Surveillance experts warn about the dangers of using facial recognition to monitor protests.
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​Amazon devices have colonized homes. 'Smart neighborhoods' may be next

Here's why you may want to opt-out of Amazon's new shared network.

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  • Speaking at Web Summit 2020, David Limp, the senior vice president of Devices and Services at Amazon, suggested that the company is aiming to build smart devices that would operate in neighborhoods.
  • Amazon recently began rolling out Sidewalk, which aims to create a shared, intermediate-range network powered by Amazon devices.
  • Sidewalk, which lets nearby devices access your Wi-Fi, raises numerous privacy and security concerns.
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Study suggests most "dark web" users are not engaging in illicit activities

A new study finds that some people just want privacy.

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  • Despite its reputation as a tool for criminals, only a small percentage of Tor users were actually going to the dark web.
  • The rate was higher in free countries and lower in countries with censored internet access.
  • The findings are controversial, and may be limited by their methodology to be general assumptions.
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All the storage you'll ever need to back up your data for under $100

Degoo's secure backups are available at a great price.

  • 140,000 hard drives crash in America every week.
  • 93 percent of businesses that suffer data loss for over 10 days file for bankruptcy within 12 months.
  • Four million data records are stolen or lost every single day.
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How face masks are fooling facial recognition software

A new study explores how wearing a face mask affects the error rates of popular facial recognition algorithms.

Credit: B. Hayes/NIST
  • The study measured the error rates of 89 commercial facial recognition technologies as they attempted to match photos of people with and without masks.
  • Wearing a mask increased error rates by 5 to 50 percent among the algorithms.
  • The researchers said they expect facial recognition technology to get better at recognizing people wearing masks. But it's not clear that that's what Americans want.
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