The science of music: Why your brain gets hooked on hit songs

There's a reason you can't stop you head boppin' to block-rockin' beats, and why you can't get a song's hook out of your head.

There's a reason you can't stop your head boppin' to block-rockin' beats, and why you can't get a catchy song's hook out of your head. The Atlantic editor Derek Thompson lays down a spoken-word jam about the science behind music's appeal. Derek Thompson's latest book is Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction.

Scientists Use CRISPR Gene Editing to Create the World's First Mutant Social Insect

Researchers succeed in deleting key genes from ants, significantly modifying their behavior.

credit: Rockefeller University.

A staple of bad science fiction, mutant ants have been more of a figment of imagination rather than scientific reality. We’ve genetically altered mice and fruit flies, but growing mutant ants has eluded scientists due to the complex life cycle of the little critters. Now two teams announced that they managed to edit out certain genes from lab ants, altering their behavior.  

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Talking to Yourself Out Loud May Be a Sign of Higher Intelligence, Find Researchers

A new study shows how talking to yourself may help your brain perform better.

Man talking to a statue that looks like him. Credit: Pixabay.

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Study finds link between brain damage and religious fundamentalism

A new study finds a connection between brain lesions and the ability of a person to consider other beliefs.

Eyerusalem Solomon of Tacoma Park, Maryland, prays for Pope John Paul II in the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception March 31, 2005 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Scientists found that damage in a certain part of the brain is linked to an increase in religious fundamentalism. In particular, lesions in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex reduced cognitive flexibility - the ability to challenge our beliefs based on new evidence.

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Artificial Human Wombs Closer As Scientists Grow Lambs in Unique "BioBags"

Scientists successfully test an ingenious system for growing premature fetuses.

Lamb fetus in a BioBag. Credit: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

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