The Divine Fire of Philip K Dick’s Religious Visions

His guiding spirit Thomas helped the author make better financial decisions and take care of his health.

 

 

Philip K. Dick android. Photo by Rasmus Lerdorf via Flickr, Creative Commons

Although the earliest psychoanalysts saw religion as neurotic, the modern mental health field has stopped pathologising religious beliefs. Contemporary systems of psychiatric diagnosis have no problem with a belief in God, Zoroaster, Demeter, or the Moon Goddess. At least in theory, we are free to hold whatever religious beliefs we wish without fear of being labelled mentally ill.

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Mind & Brain

The History of Brainwashing Is a Red Flag for Techno-therapy

Pocket-sized therapies, like counseling apps, are praised as a timely solution to the budgetary pressures and long waiting lists of overstretched mental health services. But do they work?

Virtual reality and technology addiction, the bad side of VR in a classic nightmare representation. (Credit: Koron)

For Donald Ewen Cameron—a Scottish-born psychiatrist, the president of numerous medical societies, and the director of the Allan Memorial Institute in Montreal between 1943 and 1965—technology was a passion bordering on an obsession. While his tattered tweed suits and mismatched socks lent him the air of an absent-minded university don, Cameron was fixated on the future, from his collection of high-powered cars, to his constant use of Dictaphones, to the science-fiction novels that littered his bedside table. As this ‘technophilia’ deepened and began to shape his psychiatric thinking in the 1950s, Cameron was set on a collision course with Cold War conspiracy.

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Surprising Science

Study: More Americans Than Ever Have Serious Mental Illnesses but Fewer Can Get Help

A study finds an increasing number of Americans live with serious mental issues and their access to healthcare is getting worse.

Credit: Pixabay.

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Mind & Brain

New Research Suggests an Unlikely Treatment for PTSD: Antibiotics

There is a new era of PTSD science just around the corner.

 

US Army soldiers carry a wounded comrade injured in an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blast during a patrol near Baraki Barak base in Logar Province, Afghanistan in 2012. (Photo Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images)

With each passing day, the world provides us with grim reminders of a growing public health crisis. Society used to brush it off as a "case of the nerves", before labeling it as "shell shock", but today we know it as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Surprising Science

Ketamine: A Club Drug That May Be the Future of Antidepressants

Studies and trials point to the potential of a rave drug becoming the newest antidepressant medication in decades.

Early risers take part in a Morning Glory 'Rave Your Way Into The Day!' morning dance experience at Village Underground on September 4, 2013 in Shoreditch, London, England. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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Surprising Science