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Former Navy Seal
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Bryan Cranston
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Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
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Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Antidepressants linked to increased suicide and self-harm in teens

A new study pushes back on psychiatry industry talking points.

Photo: Anemone123 / Pixabay
  • Australian researchers note a link between rising antidepressant usage and rising suicide rates in youth.
  • Their research pushes back on psychiatry talking points that SSRIs decrease suicide risk.
  • The top method for self-harm and suicide in younger age groups is overdosing antidepressants.
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Weight gain affects the efficacy of antidepressants, new study finds

Weight gain is a side effect of antidepressants, adding another layer of problems.

Photo: Philippe Huguen/AFP via Getty Images
  • A comprehensive scoping review of 12 studies found that being overweight negatively affects the efficacy of antidepressants.
  • McGill University researchers investigated SSRIs, SNRIs, tricyclic antidepressants, and tetracyclic antidepressants.
  • A double-edged sword: Obesity impacts antidepressants, yet a side effect of these drugs is weight gain.
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The Divine Fire of Philip K Dick’s Religious Visions

His guiding spirit Thomas helped the author make better financial decisions and take care of his health.

 

 

Philip K. Dick android. Photo by Rasmus Lerdorf via Flickr, Creative Commons

Although the earliest psychoanalysts saw religion as neurotic, the modern mental health field has stopped pathologising religious beliefs. Contemporary systems of psychiatric diagnosis have no problem with a belief in God, Zoroaster, Demeter, or the Moon Goddess. At least in theory, we are free to hold whatever religious beliefs we wish without fear of being labelled mentally ill.

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The History of Brainwashing Is a Red Flag for Techno-therapy

Pocket-sized therapies, like counseling apps, are praised as a timely solution to the budgetary pressures and long waiting lists of overstretched mental health services. But do they work?

Virtual reality and technology addiction, the bad side of VR in a classic nightmare representation. (Credit: Koron)

For Donald Ewen Cameron—a Scottish-born psychiatrist, the president of numerous medical societies, and the director of the Allan Memorial Institute in Montreal between 1943 and 1965—technology was a passion bordering on an obsession. While his tattered tweed suits and mismatched socks lent him the air of an absent-minded university don, Cameron was fixated on the future, from his collection of high-powered cars, to his constant use of Dictaphones, to the science-fiction novels that littered his bedside table. As this ‘technophilia’ deepened and began to shape his psychiatric thinking in the 1950s, Cameron was set on a collision course with Cold War conspiracy.

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Study: More Americans Than Ever Have Serious Mental Illnesses but Fewer Can Get Help

A study finds an increasing number of Americans live with serious mental issues and their access to healthcare is getting worse.

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