Could neo-paganism be the new 'religion' of America?

Witchcraft and pagan spiritualities are on the rise in the United States — especially within mainstream youth culture.

Photo by Steven Carroll Photography / Getty Images.
  • As Americans turn away from organized religion, pagan spiritualities gain popularity and visibility.
  • Although it isn't a homogenized religion, groups identifying within neo-paganism share some uniting principles.
  • Witchcraft, which is traditionally associated with women, finds strength and new life in feminist movements.
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14 movies for your next pagan holiday

In your Ostara bonnet…

  • 14 pagan-flavored movies to consider for your next holiday get-together.
  • Filmmakers just can't stay way from the pagan love of nature and magic.
  • Pagan-themed movies can be excellent training for wee environmentalists.
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It's February and according to pagans, spring is upon us

Have we turned the corner of a cold winter?

A fire-cage swinging, Imbolc 2007, Marsden, England. Image source: Steven Earnshaw on Flickr
  • The ancient holiday of Imbolc celebrates the imminent return of the sun in spring.
  • The holiday also commemorates either goddess Bhrigid or St. Brigid, who may or may not be the same person.
  • Good weather on Imbolc means more winter to come.
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We’ve been celebrating pagan holidays a long time

Some things have always been worth celebrating.

Photo credit: Flickr user Christof
  • Some lost ancient holidays aren't really so lost after all.
  • All of us celebrate at least some pagan traditions whether we know it or not.
  • There are two things that tend to bring humans together: crises and holidays.
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