How to think smarter about failure

There is no success without failure, but the fear of the latter is what's really keeping you from achieving your goals.

  • What does it mean to be a failure? Failing is typically seen as moving in the opposite direction of a specific goal, when in reality, most achievements in history were made possible by a series of non-successes.
  • "The very concepts of success and failure are words that never really meant anything," says astronomer Michelle Thaller. She and others argue that successes and failures are inextricably linked, and that how we define them for ourselves is what matters.
  • As Ethan Hawke, multidisciplinary filmmaker Karen Palmer, entrepreneurs Steve Case and Tim Ferriss, executive coach Alisa Cohn, and others explain, finding personal success means taking risks, being willing to fail, and recognizing when—and why—things are not working. "Most things will fail, but that doesn't mean you're a failure," Steve Case says. "That just means that idea failed. And what can you learn from that idea and then move forward."

4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work

More than 70% of college students procrastinate

Photo by Callum T on Unsplash

If you take classes online, chances are you probably procrastinate from time to time.

Keep reading Show less

How leaders influence people to believe

Being a leader is about more than the job title. You have to earn respect.

  • What does it take to be a leader? For Northwell Health president and CEO Michael Dowling, having an Ivy League degree and a large office is not what makes a leader. Leadership requires something much less tangible: influence.
  • True leaders inspire people to follow and believe in them and the organization's mission by being passionate, having humility, and being a real part of the team. This is especially important in a field like health care, where guidance and teamwork save lives.
  • Authenticity is also key. "Don't pretend, be real," says Dowling. "Accept your vulnerabilities, accept your weaknesses, know where your strengths are, and get people to belong."
Keep reading Show less

The way we teach science misses something key: Human context

Why do we deprive students of the historical and cultural context of science?

Credit: Adobe Stock via Archivist and stta
  • The teaching of science must and can be humanized at all levels, from nonscience courses to technical advanced courses.
  • By teaching science only as a technical endeavor, we deprive students and future scientists of a more inclusive worldview where science is seen as part of our human need to make sense of the world.
  • The challenges we face in the modern world call for an engagement of the sciences and the humanities that starts in the classroom and becomes an essential aspect of the public sphere.
Keep reading Show less

The lost art of rest: How to relax

In her book The Art of Rest, one researcher conducted a thorough analysis of the top 10 activities we find most restful.

Photo by MARIA E. MAYOBRE on Unsplash

Even though our bodies and minds are begging for a break, modern culture has turned rest into a sin. So how can we catch a breath?

Keep reading Show less
Quantcast