Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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COVID-19 lockdown is unleashing people's creativity

Armed with today's advanced digital tools and itching to express ourselves, "boredom" is bringing out the best in us.

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  • While staying at home, many are exploring their creative sides to unprecedented levels, sharing their creations with the world in similarly novel, and sometimes collaborative, ways.
  • People are finding amazing ways to create and to share from the safety of their homes using apps designed to promote expression and not simply distract users.
  • Creative professionals are also stuck at home, facing unemployment, and a lack of access to their usual creative outlets.

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Nutrisystem review: The key to losing weight—and keeping it off

Nutrisystem is a smarter weight-loss program that users enjoy.

Credit: Nutrisystem
  • The societal and economic consequences of obesity cannot be ignored.
  • The economic impact is up to $190 billion every year in America.
  • Americans spend up to $2.5 billion each year on popular weight-loss programs.
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How learning journals can help students grow

Even non-academic experiences can inspire meaningful moments of learning and self-reflection.

  • Jiang Xueqin, an educator and researcher at Harvard Graduate School of Education, endorses learning journals as a good method to promote meta-learning for students during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Learning journals can be kept for any activity and have three components: defining a goal "concretely and precisely," writing down the process, and writing down observations and reflecting on the experience.
  • While learning journals are primarily a personal exercise, Xueqin says that teachers can play a crucial role as coaches who motivate the student and find ways for them to improve with new learning strategies.
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11 ways to stop procrastinating—for good

We're all guilty of it, but there are ways to curb your procrastination and be more productive.

  • Most of us feel guilty or lazy when we put things off until a later date or time, but procrastination is normal and happens to everyone. The key is not to eliminate the word from your vocabulary, but to find ways to work and rest smarter so that tasks get done.
  • In this video, investor Tim Ferriss, behavioral economist Dan Ariely, health and wellness expert Jillian Michaels, and others share 11 tips for mastering procrastination including focusing on long-term happiness, understanding the differences between inspiration and motivation, trying the Pomodoro technique, and removing the things that are distracting you from the project at hand.
  • One interesting tip shared by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charles Duhigg is to build procrastination into your workflow as a reward. "If you need five minutes every hour to look at tweets or to just surf the internet, you need to schedule that into your schedule." According to Duhigg, it's when we try to ignore that urge completely that things fall apart.

Want to feel better? Science says to care for your dog

Admit it, caring for your pet can make you happy too. Science is working on why.

Photo by Kat Jayne from Pexels
  • A study shows that caring for your pets can improve your well-being.
  • The researchers found the act of caring provided more improvements than mere companionship.
  • These results aren't limited to pets. Plenty of studies show caring for others can improve your well-being.
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