The neuroscience behind ‘gut feelings’

Fight or flight? We've all been there. Now we have an understanding of how it works.

  • There is such a thing in neuroscience as a 'gut feeling.'
  • We don't quite know what it's saying yet, but we have an idea.
  • "Gut signals are transmitted at epithelial-neural synapses through the release of … serotonin."
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Surprising Science

Cambridge Scientists Develop Quintuple-Power Battery Inspired By Gut Bacteria

A UK-Chinese team of scientists have delivered a prototype for a better battery, which could extend the time between smartphone charges – and it's all inspired by our guts.

Say goodbye to carting your phone charger with you everywhere! ... But not until 2020.

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Technology & Innovation

Dr Emeran Mayer: Your Gut Processes Emotion and Regulates Health While You Sleep

Your brain isn't the only organ processing your day while you sleep. Dr. Emeran Mayer explains the circular processing of emotion and memory that goes on between your brain and your digestive system, and how the latter can "dream".

There is so much more going on in your sleep than you think.

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Surprising Science

Scientific Studies Using Mice May Be Hard to Replicate Due to Gut Microbes

Scientists are concerned that the results of studies using mice may be affected by gut bacteria.

Mice in a laboratory

Mice and other rodents are a staple of laboratory research. In fact, mice are the most commonly used vertebrate species. They are popular because you can get them easily and cheaply, they are small, reproduce quickly, share 99% of their genes with humans, and can be utilized to study genetic human diseases. But studies that rely on mice may potentially be difficult to replicate due to the differing gut contents of the rodents.

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Surprising Science

Science: drinking wine and coffee is good for your gut

A new study identifies key dietary factors that lead to healthy microbes in your gut.

If you love wine or coffee, you are in luck, say new findings from researchers at the University of Groningen in Netherlands. Drinking such beverages has been shown to lead to healthier and more diverse microbes in your gut.

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Surprising Science